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Help with Amp Fuse


hyper

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Ok guys forgive me for what may seem a stupid question, long story short my McIntosh 2301 amp right channel died tonight and I decided to pull the fuse out and it looks blown, so I took the one out of left channel and the right amp worked so it's the fuse blown. Now my stupid question is how do I work out what fuse to change it with and where to get them? Only writing on the fuse is "buss gma4 and buss 125v"

Any advice would be appreciated thanks guys

Sorry for stupid question !

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It's not listed in the manual?

 

http://www.mcintoshlabs.com/us/Products/pages/ProductDetails.aspx?CatId=Amplifiers&ProductId=MC2301

 

 

Edit:  Actually, it isn't, they tell you to read the back of your amp to find out, but page 22 under the "Power Requirements" should give you an idea.

 

You could always email the company if you're not certain.

Edited by Cafad
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It's not listed in the manual?

http://www.mcintoshlabs.com/us/Products/pages/ProductDetails.aspx?CatId=Amplifiers&ProductId=MC2301

Edit: Actually, it isn't, they tell you to read the back of your amp to find out, but page 22 under the "Power Requirements" should give you an idea.

You could always email the company if you're not certain.

So it seems whilst it was factory converted in USA it still had the USA fuse in it, well that's what I am assuming due to the 4A 125v, given that I'm wondering whether I get a 240v at say >2.75amp, based on power requirements?

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It doesn’t matter what voltage it is, assuming that you have read that correctly then its 4A or 4amps.  Just to confuse things there are 2 types of fuses, quick and slow blow!  Quick blow are ones that have a single strand thin wire, where slow blow are either thicker or have a spring type winding.  if in doubt use a quick blow 4 amp 1st.

 

Normally if a fuse go it means that you either have shorted something out or something more sinister is on its way out.

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I'm not sure if 2.75 amp is an actual fuse rating but 2.5 and 3.0 amp ratings are pretty standard. I'd go for a 3 amp fuse, fast blow unless it says somewhere that Macs are meant to use slow blow fuses.

 

How long have you been using the amp hyper?

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It doesn’t matter what voltage it is, assuming that you have read that correctly then its 4A or 4amps. Just to confuse things there are 2 types of fuses, quick and slow blow! Quick blow are ones that have a single strand thin wire, where slow blow are either thicker or have a spring type winding. if in doubt use a quick blow 4 amp 1st.

Normally if a fuse go it means that you either have shorted something out or something more sinister is on its way out.

Thanks PC appreciated mate does it matter if the amp rating is higher then needed? Eg if needs 2.75 and you use a 4a? 99.99% sure it's a fast blow mate as when I looked up the model on the net it said fast blow, I also just looked at the fuse which is ok and its thin rather then thick

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I'm not sure if 2.75 amp is an actual fuse rating but 2.5 and 3.0 amp ratings are pretty standard. I'd go for a 3 amp fuse, fast blow unless it says somewhere that Macs are meant to use slow blow fuses.

How long have you been using the amp hyper?

Hey caf, yeh was thinking I will go a 4 which is what was in it assuming it's ok to go greater then what's needed??

Not long mate only like 2 months and it was mint condition and about 10-12months old when I got it

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Thats the one Hyper.

 

 

If it isn't something wrong with amp wonder what could have done it? Power board surge?

 

A short across the speaker terminals could have done it.  If you replaced that fuse and it happens again, you need to take it back for repairs.

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Thats the one Hyper.

A short across the speaker terminals could have done it. If you replaced that fuse and it happens again, you need to take it back for repairs.

Interestingly enough I actually had to change the black and red speaker cable over to get it back in phase as DEQX picked up a phase issue, it does sound fine now I just put it down to red/black being labelled wrong when terminating as its a spaghetti type limber cable .

So it doesn't matter having a higher amp rating on the fuse then ?

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So it doesn't matter having a higher amp rating on the fuse then ?

 

Always replace the fuse with the same rating, avoid a higher rating if you can, fuse are there to protect against shorts, if you try a higher rating it may do more damage if something goes wrong.  Thats why if in doubt of the type use then use a fast blow with the same rating to start with.

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So it doesn't matter having a higher amp rating on the fuse then ?

If the amp is working properly, a higher rating will allow the amp to work fine. However it won't offer the same amount of protection as the correct rating fuse.

 

I'm not sure about valve amps, but in transistor amps fuses aren't anywhere near fast enough to protect against damage due to a short circuit condition. Short circuit protection is usually handled by active circuitry in the output stage instead. The fuse is usually a last resort to prevent a total meltdown, fire, etc. If the fuse pops when you aren't playing the amp at a very high level, usually damage has already been done.

 

Replace the fuse with the correct value, never higher. Replacing it with a lower value is fine - the worst that can happen is that the fuse pops prematurely. If the amp does have a fault, having the correct rating fuse could be the difference between just popping the fuse again or blowing the arse end out of everything and causing an even more expensive repair.

Edited by TMM
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Thanks PC appreciated mate does it matter if the amp rating is higher then needed? Eg if needs 2.75 and you use a 4a? 99.99% sure it's a fast blow mate as when I looked up the model on the net it said fast blow, I also just looked at the fuse which is ok and its thin rather then thick

 

NEVER EVER use a higher rated fuse.

 

NEVER

NEVER 

NEVER.

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Jokes aside, it is often possible to tell what type of fault to look for (in general terms) by looking at a blown fuse. i.e. if the fuse wire has just separated, it is unlikely to be a major fault, more like a continuous load just over it's rating, or simply an old fuse. In this case, just replace the fuse with one of like values. If there is no or little fuse wire left, start looking for a dead short or major fault, and beware of replacing the fuse until the fault has been diagnosed.

As an electrician, if I ever have to replace a blown High Rupturing Capacity (HRC) fuse, I will ALWAYS crack open the old fuse first and have a look.

 

Regards,

 

SS

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Thanks all for feedback , quick update got a 4A fuse this morning, now I did notice that one tube was glowing heaps less then others and as I was about to roll the tubes anyways I've replaced all tubes as well, may have been a faulty tube? So far so good!!! :) thanks again for all the feedback, ps, Mac confirmed over night that it should be replaced with 4a fuse as well

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