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interesting Read for vinyl fans....


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Tasebass,

 

thanks for this link. A really interesting read.

 

The thing I love about vinyl is the physicality of it as a support; this article explains in depth how the physical phenomena occurring on the horizontal/vertical plane of a record affects both the recording and playback of sound. Makes me appreciate a lot more why using the best stylus possible is so important.

 

Because we live a physical world and have bodies, that like vinyl, react to touch, stimuli and are affected by weight and gravity, then in terms of energy, the analogue experience is much closer to the essence of who we are than a series of 0&1 's behaving in a codified mathematical arrangement (digital). 

 

I have nothing against digital at all, but if I had to choose between digitalised sex and physical sex, I know which one I'd take.

 

M

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I'm still amazed at how it all works to be honest.

Grooves and stylus etc, that's all good and well, but how the hell does that reproduce something which was picked up by a microphone....

Amazing.

I mean, I can appreciate and understand how an internal combustion engine or electric motor works, but stuff like records, TV signals and even cassette recordings amaze and baffle me.

:)

Edited by Dirty_vinylpusher
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I'm still amazed at how it all works to be honest.

Grooves and stylus etc, that's all good and well, but how the hell does that reproduce something which was picked up by a microphone....

 

 

I'm the same... amazing and very thankful

:)

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I'm still amazed at how it all works to be honest.

Grooves and stylus etc, that's all good and well, but how the hell does that reproduce something which was picked up by a microphone....

Amazing.

I mean, I can appreciate and understand how an internal combustion engine or electric motor works, but stuff like records, TV signals and even cassette recordings amaze and baffle me.

:)

There's magic here, more than I can fathom.

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Cheers Guys

 

The piece is a few years old (references to DAT gives that away)! :)

 

I find this particularly interesting..

 

Let’s take a look at cymbals and vocal sibilance (those loud ‘S’ sounds). "Why", do you ask, "Do they sound OK on the tape but sometimes so awful on the record?" The answer is twofold. First, the problem is aggravated by the high frequency boost we just discussed. Further excessive boost in your mix makes it that much worse. Unlike a cymbal crash in which the impulse is short (the actual hit of the stick on the cymbal), the duration of an ‘S’ is considerably longer, so it is even more pronounced. And second, the worst part: Remember the river? Suppose the river’s twists and turns are actually tighter than your raft? Ever watch a raft attempting rapids? Well, that is exactly what your stylus is doing when it hits a loud cymbal crash or a loud ‘S’ in the record groove. At the instant that the curvature of the groove is tighter than the tip radius of your stylus (raft), it goes over instead of through ‘the rapids’, and you have 100 percent distortion. The higher the frequency and or level, the greater the curvature and distortion.

The cutting engineer can usually tell if treble peaks are going to ‘break up’ on playback, by the amount of current drawn by the cutting amplifier. This is measured by current meters on the amplifiers. If the current is excessive, the only way to prevent this is to use a very fast-attack treble limiter to reduce the intensity, and therefore, the groove curvature.

 
I have struggled with the dreaded "S" problem ever since my ESC re-tipped DV XX2 arrived back late last year.
 
The problem is quite bad on some vinyl but virtually perfect on others, checked settings and everything else I can think of over several times eventually concluding the problem must be the vinyl itself.
I cant blame the equipment I use for faithfully reproducing whats on the vinyl if the recording engineer never got it right int he first place!! :huh:
 
Tase.
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I often thought that its my stylus thats at fault RE sibilance, but this makes me feel bettter knowing it was the sound engineer too blame! Saying this, I have found that my upgrade to a Ortofon Bronze has reduced sibilance by an enormous degree due its very fine (thin) stylus.

M

Edited by Milos
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