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When an Allen key isn't an Allen key!


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It's got me scratching my head, that's for sure:confused:
 
Here's what is going on:
I own a set of Thiel CS5 speakershttp://www.stereophile.com/floorloudspeakers/690thiel/

Now I have recently tried to remove one of my tweeters and noticed that the screws that mount the tweeters are a Allen key type screw. Knowing that the USA still use the imperial system, I picked up my imperial set of Allen keys. Went through them and found one that was just a little too small. Ok now, logically the next one up in size in my set of keys should fit.......nope, it's too big. WTF, I scratch my head! So now I dig out my metric set, and the same thing happens, either too small or too big.

 

Anyone have any ideas what is going on here??   

 

And yes, they are definitely Allen key type screws.

 

Please......help :thumb:  

 

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Torx bit tool may work. I know there is a difference between Allen key and Torx but worth a shot.

I just wouldn't want to damage the key/hole in any way by trying that.

Thanks for the advice anyway :thumb:

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what about the metric ones? Sorry I half read your post.

 

Be careful with CS screws and their key sockets - sometimes it appears that a key is too big but if you use a ball end ones they fit nicely

Edited by Decky
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It's got me scratching my head, that's for sure:confused:

 

Here's what is going on:

I own a set of Thiel CS5 speakershttp://www.stereophile.com/floorloudspeakers/690thiel/

Now I have recently tried to remove one of my tweeters and noticed that the screws that mount the tweeters are a Allen key type screw. Knowing that the USA still use the imperial system, I picked up my imperial set of Allen keys. Went through them and found one that was just a little too small. Ok now, logically the next one up in size in my set of keys should fit.......nope, it's too big. WTF, I scratch my head! So now I dig out my metric set, and the same thing happens, either too small or too big.

 

Anyone have any ideas what is going on here??   

 

And yes, they are definitely Allen key type screws.

 

Please......help :thumb:  

 

As buzz said (and I extrapolated) ... buy a torx tool.  (Which are "Allen-type" but not "Allen".)

 

You won't "damage the hole" by just inserting it, to see if it fits. But you might have to buy a 2nd one, if the first one you choose is the wrong size. ;)

 

 

Andy

Edited by andyr
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Those 'Torx' screws are a 'bugger'! Go to do a simple job on an appliance and what do you know, can't even open up the back cover without a special too! WTF! :confused:

In my line of work I have to use Allen screws all day long and the smaller sizes are rubbish because they strip out far too easily. Torx are far superior because it is almost impossible for them to strip. I have never stripped one yet. I wish they were used more.

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In my line of work I have to use Allen screws all day long and the smaller sizes are rubbish because they strip out far too easily. Torx are far superior because it is almost impossible for them to strip. I have never stripped one yet. I wish they were used more.

 

Looks like ill have to invest in a set!

 

By the way 'Kincrome' are vey decent tools allround!

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In my line of work I have to use Allen screws all day long and the smaller sizes are rubbish because they strip out far too easily. Torx are far superior because it is almost impossible for them to strip. I have never stripped one yet. I wish they were used more.

There are couple of reasons Allen keys strip,

Over tightened with locktite,

Or the they are crappy set that aren't made to spec so they round themselves out. The above kincrome set is work issued and I have never stripped one with this set no matter how tiny it is.

Torx will give you a better lock and and tolerate some real force for the size but most use Allen keys because it is cheaper and greater availability.

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This is the difference between an Allen key hex and a Torx hex

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

They are definitely Allen key hex type screws.

I even had to get a second opinion from a good friend (who is employed in the metal trade industry)because I thought my eyesight was failing me!

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Hey Sean if your down my way I can loan you a Torx set to try.

 

 

As buzz said (and I extrapolated) ... buy a torx tool.  (Which are "Allen-type" but not "Allen".)

 

You won't "damage the hole" by just inserting it, to see if it fits. But you might have to buy a 2nd one, if the first one you choose is the wrong size. ;)

 

 

Andy

Andy and Buzz, thanks for the offer and the advice.

But I don't really want to put a torx tool in a hex hole if you know what I mean!

 

 

Whit worth size? Unlikely, a bit old.

The thought did cross my mind Glen.

 

 

Where are you in Victoria, I have all the Allen keys you need. There are Allen keys and there are the cheap crap but this set just about covers everything.

I am in Airport West and thanks for the offer of a loan.

Thanks again for all the replies.

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