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The industry supported by Standards Australia have launched a website that has some very pertinent information for people in the industry, consumers and particualrly it has implications for DIY'ers and worth a read.

 

The particular aspects relating to DIY would concern where utilising 3rd party power supplies, USB powered devices, USB power supplies, 230V AC related equipment etc.

To quote Monkeyboi (Alan) whom suggested this sticky, this website and links are

 

"essential reading for all those involved in DIY that encompasses the building or modifying of mains powered devices.  Many DIY kits involve building even pre-assembled power supplies, use plug packs or operate from typical USB 5 volt adapters."

 

With a recent fatality

http://www.stereo.net.au/forums/index.php?/topic/67453-warning-on-usb-chargers

 

it is come clear it is very much case of buyer beware. But also the ramifications go further if you actually DIY/make something and sell it on...keep in mind you are then the manufacturer and its upto you to ensure it complies ...

 

the industry supported by standards australia has a website "Does it comply" and is here to try and help...

 

http://www.doesitcomply.com.au

 

there is a section to help identify conforming product

http://www.doesitcomply.com.au/what_should_you_do/identifying_compliant_product

 

and there is a webform to report to the electrical regulator a non compliant item

http://www.doesitcomply.com.au/what_should_you_do/report-non-compliant-product

 

also sections on who is liable, whether a contractor, supplier or wholesaler

http://www.doesitcomply.com.au/who_is_liable/wholesalers_suppliers

 

oh and incase you wondered since july last year if you actually grey import something it is your responsiblity to make sure it is compliant...and yep as an individual you will also be liable if you resell the item. the fines for individuals are quite significant as are the criminal sentences for selling non compliant product.

 

anyways I do hope this is of some help, the work the industry is doing here to help is invaluable and if even just saves one injury or fatality its well worth it ! 

 

dgr20.gif  Electric-shock.jpg

 

What can and can't do around the house when comes to electricity,

 

http://news.domain.com.au/domain/diy/what-not-to-diy-with-plumbing-and-electrical-20120619-20ld9.html

 

*** basically beyond changing a light bulb…forget about it … get an electrician for anything related to mains electricity as it can kill you ! ***

 

ps great link here from DVP

 

http://www.stereo.net.au/forums/index.php?/topic/79823-inside-an-apple-charger/

 

shows the difference between a cheap counterfeit and an apple charger ! and why he cheap non compliant chargers is a potential accident waiting to happen !  the worrying thing which doesn't help is the counterfeit is complete rip off externally so you are none the wiser. Probably only re enforces reason to buy from reputable sources this kind of thing.

 

Stereonet article - Does your Power cable comply,

http://www.stereo.net.au/news/does-your-power-cord-comply

 

have also added a good note below from ampish.. as picks up on some very important points....

On 11/01/2020 at 7:47 PM, ampish said:

I have just read through this thread and as an electrical design engineer that deals with AS3000 (to name one of many local and international standards), compliance, legal requirements etc etc more or less on a daily basis I am a little aghast at some of what I read here.

 

I am not going to go into endless technical details, it seems my key message would end up being lost.

 

Firstly, the issue is not compliance, it is safety.

 

Surprisingly there is more to safety than compliance.

 

Any electric shock is a bad one, but even worse when someones house burns down and a whole family is lost, which is actually somewhat more likely.

 

And, regardless of an real or percieved compliance achieved, there are a number of legal aspects to consider.

 

1) "Duty of Care" and "Competency" - it would very unlikely that any kind of investigation is going to consider someone who modifies or constructs an apliance of any kind that leads to harm was comptetent to even know if they had discharged their dury of care without some kind of recognised qualification or certification.

 

If you believe otherwise, you may well be right, but you will probably lose a year or more of life (plus costs, lost earnigns stress etc) going through the legal process to argue the point, as a minimum.

 

I know a fellow engineer who had exactly his occur due to a missing MEN link on a construction job, that he had specified and drawn, but the installer messed up. Engineer was not even on site at the time.

 

2) Duty of Manufacturers - look up your states "Code of Practice" (there is a national one now, mostly) - manufacturers have very specific obligations related to design, construction, informing the user of risks etc etc etc. Many OEM's often fall short in some areas, large and small. I doubt virtually any DIYers would meet the requirments.

 

So none of this matters if there is no incident.

 

But if there is, it will matter and awful lot, and lives could be ruined even if no fatality occurs.

 

I know a lot of guys like tube amps, I just don't bother myself.

 

Best plan overall is to wherever possible stick to under 50V (this is he simplest blanket rule) and use double insulated power supplies that plug into a standard outlet, ready to go from the manufacturer. 

 

 

 

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The industry supported by Standards Australia have launched a website that has some very pertinent information for people in the industry, consumers and particualrly it has implications for DIY'ers an

As an engineer in a previous life working in a related field, I had many conversations with others where they thought their confidence over-ruled my competence. Me stating clauses to them from Au

Hi, If anyone has any doubts regarding what an be done or not, then call your local state regulator. For example I had a chat with the NSW regulator (dept fair trading) and they advised that I could

A rule worth remembering, if you selling a piece of mains powered equipment to ANYBODY, once you've demonstrated the the item is working, cut the mains plug off before you hand it over. It is then the buyers responsibility to have a suitably qualified and certified person to fit a new plug and then the responsiblity for the safety of the product falls on that person. It is important you cut the cord outer insulation and all and not remove the plug leaving bare wire ends. keep the severed plug and cord, you may need it as evidence if things go badly.

Edited by Number 9
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Interesting link in the http://www.doesitcomply.com.au/article/dial-the-source-on-emc-compliance about LED downights effecting Wifi and other equipment.

 

I am planning to use them in a theatre room soon.

Anyone have any problems at all with LED lighting? What about dimmers for them?

Most LED downlights are powered by a switched mode supply. it is the RF interference from the supply that can cause problems with WIFI.  I don't kwow what the standard is now, but when I building gear for the US long ago, if it had a clock running at any more than 1400Hz, it required FCC testing. the regs for AU & NZ are alot stricter now and CE is a total nightmare.

 

I always check the website of of the producer to see that the certifications are all in order, UL , CE, FCC etc. If they don't show them I assume they don't have them!

Edited by Number 9
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A rule worth remembering, if you selling a piece of mains powered equipment to ANYBODY, once you've demonstrated the the item is working, cut the mains plug off before you hand it over.

 

Or you could just send it directly to landfill and cut out the (now likely extremely annoyed) middleman.

Edited by thoglette
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Cutting the lead off and keeping it is a good idea, but also bend all three pins so that there is no chance of someone (children etc) accidentally plugging the lead into an outlet and getting a shock off the end of the cord.

 

Note that this plug also has uninsulated pins, another reason to remove the plug.

 

Regards,

 

SS

post-133526-0-69102100-1404092175_thumb.

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All the DIY I built, I built it so its safe for me to use and everyone else.  However saying that, I have never sold a DIY that involves a 240V plug to anyone period.  Once I am done with a project its on the shelf for parts reasignment for future use. 

I have given DIY projects for other family members to use, but I make sure thats its safe for everyone to use as long it is used correctly. 

I also make sure I use all the correct AS or EU standard parts including wiring and plugs, I never use something where an insurance company will refused to come the party especially US style plugs. 

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Most LED downlights are powered by a switched mode supply. it is the RF interference from the supply that can cause problems with WIFI.  I don't kwow what the standard is now, but when I building gear for the US long ago, if it had a clock running at any more than 1400Hz, it required FCC testing. the regs for AU & NZ are alot stricter now and CE is a total nightmare.

 

I always check the website of of the producer to see that the certifications are all in order, UL , CE, FCC etc. If they don't show them I assume they don't have them!

 

I have recently strategically replaced all compact fluros and incandecent to LEDs and have not notice any change in the Wifi performance or TV reception.  The WiFi modem is also close to 5 X Philips 13W LED lights. 

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Or you could just send it directly to landfill and cut out the (now likely extremely annoyed) middleman.

Better to face an annoyed middle man than a Coronial Enquiry followed by Civil Damages Proceedings.

Edited by Number 9
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  • 4 weeks later...

The industry supported by Standards Australia have launched a website that has some very pertinent information for people in the industry, consumers and particualrly it has implications for DIY'ers and worth a read.

 

The particular aspects relating to DIY would concern where utilising 3rd party power supplies, USB powered devices, USB power supplies, 230V AC related equipment etc.

To quote Monkeyboi (Alan) whom suggested this sticky, this website and links are

 

"essential reading for all those involved in DIY that encompasses the building or modifying of mains powered devices.  Many DIY kits involve building even pre-assembled power supplies, use plug packs or operate from typical USB 5 volt adapters."

 

With a recent fatality

http://www.stereo.net.au/forums/index.php?/topic/67453-warning-on-usb-chargers

 

it is come clear it is very much case of buyer beware. But also the ramifications go further if you actually DIY/make something and sell it on...keep in mind you are then the manufacturer and its upto you to ensure it complies ...

 

the industry supported by standards australia has a website "Does it comply" and is here to try and help...

 

http://www.doesitcomply.com.au

 

there is a section to help identify conforming product

http://www.doesitcomply.com.au/what_should_you_do/identifying_compliant_product

 

and there is a webform to report to the electrical regulator a non compliant item

http://www.doesitcomply.com.au/what_should_you_do/report-non-compliant-product

 

also sections on who is liable, whether a contractor, supplier or wholesaler

http://www.doesitcomply.com.au/who_is_liable/wholesalers_suppliers

 

oh and incase you wondered since july last year if you actually grey import something it is your responsiblity to make sure it is compliant...and yep as an individual you will also be liable if you resell the item. the fines for individuals are quite significant as are the criminal sentences for selling non compliant product.

 

anyways I do hope this is of some help, the work the industry is doing here to help is invaluable and if even just saves one injury or fatality its well worth it ! 

i recommend to DIY builders to have any thing electrical that is built to be test and tag. a test and tag is preformed to asses if the A unit is electrical safe and also to check for leakage to ground . i have a test and tag license so any this i build or repair  is tested for electrical safety witch comply s  with new zealand and Australia   

AS/NZS 3760 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AS/NZS_3760

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Cutting the lead off and keeping it is a good idea, but also bend all three pins so that there is no chance of someone (children etc) accidentally plugging the lead into an outlet and getting a shock off the end of the cord.

 

Note that this plug also has uninsulated pins, another reason to remove the plug.

 

Regards,

 

SS

cut the plug off 

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A rule worth remembering, if you selling a piece of mains powered equipment to ANYBODY, once you've demonstrated the the item is working, cut the mains plug off before you hand it over. It is then the buyers responsibility to have a suitably qualified and certified person to fit a new plug and then the responsiblity for the safety of the product falls on that person. It is important you cut the cord outer insulation and all and not remove the plug leaving bare wire ends. keep the severed plug and cord, you may need it as evidence if things go badly.

better still pay the $15 $20 buck have a test and tag done the you can be a happy camper 

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Most LED downlights are powered by a switched mode supply. it is the RF interference from the supply that can cause problems with WIFI.  I don't kwow what the standard is now, but when I building gear for the US long ago, if it had a clock running at any more than 1400Hz, it required FCC testing. the regs for AU & NZ are alot stricter now and CE is a total nightmare.

 

I always check the website of of the producer to see that the certifications are all in order, UL , CE, FCC etc. If they don't show them I assume they don't have them!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AS/NZS_3760

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cut the plug off

This IS the cut off plug, which is now potentially lethal by itself due to exposed conductors unless the pins are bent in the manner shown.

Regards,

SS

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better still pay the $15 $20 buck have a test and tag done the you can be a happy camper 

 

 

Would be good to have a few links to some test and tag guys in metro areas that are happy to do domestic work.

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This IS the cut off plug, which is now potentially lethal by itself due to exposed conductors unless the pins are bent in the manner shown.

Or you could throw it in the garbage.  Along with the broken glasses/bottles, rotten food, rusty nails and out of code medicines.  Less effort too.

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At work they test & tag and even hose's like air lines ,steam hose & N2 hoses need to be tested .

 Question guys .

Test & tag is carried out to check for faults but isn't it a different testing procedure for testing a product if it complies to relevant law's .

 

Cheers 

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At work they test & tag and even hose's like air lines ,steam hose & N2 hoses need to be tested .

 Question guys .

Test & tag is carried out to check for faults but isn't it a different testing procedure for testing a product if it complies to relevant law's .

 

Cheers 

 

 

Test and tag certifies that the device is safe from electrical perspective ... that the operator will not be killed. 

 

It does not test the emissions of the device - RF radiation or conducted emissions that may effect nearby or connected equipment.

 

The test and tag is at least affordable for low volume gear. The compliance tests are expensive and sometimes destructive.

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The test and tag is at least affordable for low volume gear. The compliance tests are expensive and sometimes destructive.

To get my amps cert ,I was looking at $2K

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To get my amps cert ,I was looking at $2K

That's a lot more than the 20 or 30 mentioned above. What's scope of testing for $2k?

Edited by hochopeper
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That's a lot more than the 20 or 30 mentioned above. What's scope of testing for $2k?

Don't know I didn't go ahead . I think full safty testing and "C" ticked .Maybe worth it if I was going build and sell as a boutique manufacturer , like the word Boutique :D . My tech mate tests all my gear for my personal use .

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A rule worth remembering, if you selling a piece of mains powered equipment to ANYBODY, once you've demonstrated the the item is working, cut the mains plug off before you hand it over. It is then the buyers responsibility to have a suitably qualified and certified person to fit a new plug and then the responsiblity for the safety of the product falls on that person. It is important you cut the cord outer insulation and all and not remove the plug leaving bare wire ends. keep the severed plug and cord, you may need it as evidence if things go badly.

I think you mean a DIY piece of equipment?  I cannot see the necessity to take this action for all equipment.  It may be I'm reading your statment out-of-context?

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Or you could throw it in the garbage.  Along with the broken glasses/bottles, rotten food, rusty nails and out of code medicines.  Less effort too.

You're right in general, but I have 3 young kids, there's no knowing what they will get up to :-)

Regards,

SS

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A rule worth remembering, if you selling a piece of mains powered equipment to ANYBODY, once you've demonstrated the the item is working, cut the mains plug off before you hand it over. It is then the buyers responsibility to have a suitably qualified and certified person to fit a new plug and then the responsiblity for the safety of the product falls on that person. It is important you cut the cord outer insulation and all and not remove the plug leaving bare wire ends. keep the severed plug and cord, you may need it as evidence if things go badly.

 

And don't forget to wear your Aluminum Foil Deflector Beanie (AFDB). :ph34r:

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Don't know I didn't go ahead . I think full safty testing and "C" ticked .Maybe worth it if I was going build and sell as a boutique manufacturer , like the word Boutique :D . My tech mate tests all my gear for my personal use .

You got mates.

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Couple of issues here which may or may not be of interest..

 

1. you don't have to be qualified or licenced to fit a mains plug. It's classed as an appliance if it's plugged in to an outlet, so most of the restrictions don't apply.

 

2. you don't have to be qualified to do testing and tagging - only being considered "competent" is adequate. So if you know what you're doing, it's all good.

 

This is advice from our company's Electrical Contractor nominee, so I don't think he would stake his licence on bad advice.

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As far as replacing cords/plug of an existing certified appliance, I believe this is legal in most states for a unlicenced person to do.

It is still illegal to make your own devices and connect them to the mains supply without having them certified.

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Just some comments regarding testing and tagging and electrical safety.

The "test and tag" standard AS3760 was promulgated to cover testing of electrical equipment that is used in either a work environment (workplace) or where the public may be exposed to electrical equipment, such as a motel, school, hostel etc. It does not invalidate or bypass the requirement for any type of electrical equipment to comply with its relevant safety standards for design and construction.

The scheme provides for regular checking of "design compliant" equipment in the areas mentioned in order to minimise the chance of wear and tear, damage etc on such equipment leading to an unsafe condition.

Testing and tagging cannot take the place of certification of electrical safety compliance (design and construction) of any electrical equipment. For example, a DYI product may pass a test and tag test, but still be deemed to be unsafe (and potentially lethal) if assessed against its relevant product safety standard.

Of course performing a test and tag test will give some level of comfort, but would provide no defence if something unfortunate occurred due to he product not conforming to its relevant product safety standard.

Cheers

John

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Hi Steve,

Nearly all household appliances (apart from audio gear funnily enough) are required have local safety certification. It is illegal to sell household product without such certification. Ignore this requirement and Import at your own risk

Frankly speaking, buying non compliant electrical product of uncertain origin and construction and performance from overseas via ebay or the Internet and using it in your home is akin (IMHO) to playing Russian roulette with your family..... Just sayin.

I have been involved in electrical/electronic product design and manufacture for nearly 40 years (including Standards Committee representation for half that time) and sometimes there are no second chances when product safety is involved. Safety standards are written for a purpose, and it is not just to make compliant product more expensive.

Cheers

John

Edited by skippy124
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If you extrapolate this to people carrying out DIY automobile restorations, 

 

Straw man alert.

 

There are very clear rules associated with car modifications in each state.  At  certain points one must get licensed people involved.  

 

To pick an example  I cannot legally replace the exhaust system on five year old car/motorcycle with any old piping.  It needs to include the cat/con (or similar) plus noise management elements.

 

Now we do have a problem with policing of these sort of rules (particularly with a certain brand of American motorcycle) but it does not affect the legality

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Hi Steve,

Nearly all household appliances (apart from audio gear funnily enough) are required have local safety certification. It is illegal to sell household product without such certification. Ignore this requirement and Import at your own risk....

Cheers

John

Hi John,

I don't understand why audio equipment is exempt? Does this include HiFi power conditioning & power distribution products? There are USA products that are rated for our voltage supply but use US receptacles as outputs and IEC connector as input. Surely, these products are approved for use here?

How about consumers using imported product on step-down transformers? Eg, computer and office equipment, Hi-Fi etc. The expatriate that brings their house container here and plugs into the Australian supply. The enthusiast that imports vintage electrical equipment. Much of it USA 120v or Jap 100v... And what about all of that universal Hong Kong stuff flooding our ports?

The importer has declared the goods with Harmonized codes and country of manufacture origin, the electrical goods are allowed past customs into the country. The only thing customs seem to give a damn about is collecting the GST and any applicable duties. The exception being alcohol, tobacco, prohibitive or dangerous goods. So I can forget about that low powered laser pointer, cross-bow or depleted uranium rod, but electrical goods not rated for our supply and/or not approved with some sort of tick mark is OK. Vintage too. Jaycar or Dick Smith will sell me a big step-down transformer to run all manner of appliances. But once I've plugged the honking big heavy step-down transformer into the supply, it is no longer covered by any warranty should something go wrong... But I suppose my insurer will cover it because the step-down transformer was approved and sold by an Australian importer and retailer. Yes? I think it has some sort of compliance mark or two, whatever they represent...

We have lots of bureaucracy, state based electrical jurisdictions, Australian Standards guidelines, ACMA, A-Tick, C-Tick, and now RCM, the various recognised certification agencies, an ERAC database that is basically empty. EESS transitioning by the states except NSW because they want to trade fairer? How is the consumer supposed to know what the f# is what, when it comes to electrical equipment compliance and the regulation of electrical safety in this country. After all, basically everything is imported, nothing is Made In Australia anymore. It's a dog's breakfast.

I bet you the average Australian doesn't even know that we switched down to 230v nominal supply in year 2000 in an effort to become more compatible with the rest of the free world. But if I plug a voltage tester into my house's wall receptacle, I will get a stable 251v day in, day out. Much higher than the recognised 240v. I wonder how my new compulsory smart meter run by the electrical retailer rogue likes to calculate the charge for the above nominal voltage boost dissipation... All I know is that my power bill jumped by 33% the day they put that smart meter in.... Needless to say, the EM readings on the new WiFi box is higher than the old spinner. Not to worry, it's only hanging off the wall adjoining our bedroom and we are coping with the sleep apnoea. I understand how important it is for them to know what time of the day I use my toaster. Soon we will have a peak tariff to match toaster consumption, but they won't care about where I imported the trendy red toaster machine from. If it has eBay tape on the carton and costs less than $1,000, then it has the import tick of approval.

Consumers sell second-hand electrical equipment all of the time. Who polices that? How do they know I used it to make Australian toast? Do I need to test and tag my toaster before I sell it to my mother-in-law? I forgot to mention that my red toaster has a built-in radio.

To those of the general population who are reading this. Post an acknowledgement if you now have questions or concerns regarding the use of any electrical equipment whether that be for electrical consumption on or off grid. Do you think the Australian Federal Government should take complete statutory jurisdiction of all legislation and unify electrical use and safety in this country with a single set of regulations? A single Australian compliance mark that everyone recognises? Consistent Federal Legislation beyond Australian Standards that were written to guide the States with their independent legislation. By which the States would cede their jurisdiction control and allow for the complete Federalisation of a single unified Electricity Law. The application of Federal Electricity Law to encourage better public awareness and to promote other Federal Government initiatives, such as tighter importation and border control? Perhaps even go so far as to foster innovation incentive and rekindle "Made in Australia" once again?

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No arguments from me about safety Thoglette, it is of utmost importance.

However, the reality is you are either In the game or not in the game. You might as well tell the 200,000+ tinkerers on DIYAudio.com to stop tinkering or tell all the car hobbyists and home renovators to stop renovating. It's a hobby and the aim is to reach high without the commercial costs attached to such projects.

Steve

 

   most "hobbyists" stay well within the boundaries of the law in home renovation.   You particularly picked "car restorations" and I'm not aware of any legal issues relating to returning a vehicle to stock condition. 

 

 Modification of vehicles are another matter - particularly engine mods on post '88 cars - the legality of these are arguable.   And there's plenty of defect notices being issued to negate any argument that there is no policing of the rules regarding car modifications.  

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Steve

 

   most "hobbyists" stay well within the boundaries of the law in home renovation.   You particularly picked "car restorations" and I'm not aware of any legal issues relating to returning a vehicle to stock condition. 

 

 Modification of vehicles are another matter - particularly engine mods on post '88 cars - the legality of these are arguable.   And there's plenty of defect notices being issued to negate any argument that there is no policing of the rules regarding car modifications.  

Plenty of recalls with electrical items too: Linky.

 

And I don't mean those that don't comply to standards, but those that does but still pose a hazard.

 

While I applaud people's efforts in highlighting the safety issues, on the other hand the standards may lead people into a false sense of security. Just because something is approved doesn't mean it wouldn't hurt/kill you, or ignite.

 

Given there are at least 5 recalls per month for various reasons, personally I'm not sure the standards is effective. Much better to switch to UK standard and rely on the collective (AU/NZ is too small a market, safety is impossible to police as the numbers are too small, UK plugs are used in more regions)... The UK plug and receptacle is a much better design anyway and more durable for day to day use..

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I found this interesting, Silicon Chip tried to help us have things changed for us back in 2001, but seems it was unsuccessful http://archive.siliconchip.com.au/cms/A_101731/article.html

 

I guess the title here is true :P

http://archive.siliconchip.com.au/cms/A_110635/article.html

 

Edit: I'm surprised they let us change light bulbs in QLD

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Just make sure that you wear gloves so you don't leave any fingerprints :P

Good advice, but I'll use my lips while standing in a bucket of water like any smart Aussie would  :)

 

Hehe....I could see it now if the regulations/law went a bit further, "how many Aussies does it take to change a light bulb? answer.....none! as they aren't allowed to.

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A rule worth remembering, if you selling a piece of mains powered equipment to ANYBODY, once you've demonstrated the the item is working, cut the mains plug off before you hand it over. It is then the buyers responsibility to have a suitably qualified and certified person to fit a new plug and then the responsiblity for the safety of the product falls on that person. It is important you cut the cord outer insulation and all and not remove the plug leaving bare wire ends. keep the severed plug and cord, you may need it as evidence if things go badly.

Remind me not to buy anything electrical from you, number 9.

Though hopefully you don't actually follow this advice.

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Plenty of recalls with electrical items too: Linky.

And I don't mean those that don't comply to standards, but those that does but still pose a hazard.

While I applaud people's efforts in highlighting the safety issues, on the other hand the standards may lead people into a false sense of security. Just because something is approved doesn't mean it wouldn't hurt/kill you, or ignite.

Given there are at least 5 recalls per month for various reasons, personally I'm not sure the standards is effective. Much better to switch to UK standard and rely on the collective (AU/NZ is too small a market, safety is impossible to police as the numbers are too small, UK plugs are used in more regions)... The UK plug and receptacle is a much better design anyway and more durable for day to day use..

Never had a problem related to our plugs.
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Hi John,

I don't understand why audio equipment is exempt? Does this include HiFi power conditioning & power distribution products? There are USA products that are rated for our voltage supply but use US receptacles as outputs and IEC connector as input. Surely, these products are approved for use here?

How about consumers using imported product on step-down transformers? Eg, computer and office equipment, Hi-Fi etc. The expatriate that brings their house container here and plugs into the Australian supply. The enthusiast that imports vintage electrical equipment. Much of it USA 120v or Jap 100v... And what about all of that universal Hong Kong stuff flooding our ports?

The importer has declared the goods with Harmonized codes and country of manufacture origin, the electrical goods are allowed past customs into the country. The only thing customs seem to give a damn about is collecting the GST and any applicable duties. The exception being alcohol, tobacco, prohibitive or dangerous goods. So I can forget about that low powered laser pointer, cross-bow or depleted uranium rod, but electrical goods not rated for our supply and/or not approved with some sort of tick mark is OK. Vintage too. Jaycar or Dick Smith will sell me a big step-down transformer to run all manner of appliances. But once I've plugged the honking big heavy step-down transformer into the supply, it is no longer covered by any warranty should something go wrong... But I suppose my insurer will cover it because the step-down transformer was approved and sold by an Australian importer and retailer. Yes? I think it has some sort of compliance mark or two, whatever they represent...

We have lots of bureaucracy, state based electrical jurisdictions, Australian Standards guidelines, ACMA, A-Tick, C-Tick, and now RCM, the various recognised certification agencies, an ERAC database that is basically empty. EESS transitioning by the states except NSW because they want to trade fairer? How is the consumer supposed to know what the f# is what, when it comes to electrical equipment compliance and the regulation of electrical safety in this country. After all, basically everything is imported, nothing is Made In Australia anymore. It's a dog's breakfast.

I bet you the average Australian doesn't even know that we switched down to 230v nominal supply in year 2000 in an effort to become more compatible with the rest of the free world. But if I plug a voltage tester into my house's wall receptacle, I will get a stable 251v day in, day out. Much higher than the recognised 240v. I wonder how my new compulsory smart meter run by the electrical retailer rogue likes to calculate the charge for the above nominal voltage boost dissipation... All I know is that my power bill jumped by 33% the day they put that smart meter in.... Needless to say, the EM readings on the new WiFi box is higher than the old spinner. Not to worry, it's only hanging off the wall adjoining our bedroom and we are coping with the sleep apnoea. I understand how important it is for them to know what time of the day I use my toaster. Soon we will have a peak tariff to match toaster consumption, but they won't care about where I imported the trendy red toaster machine from. If it has eBay tape on the carton and costs less than $1,000, then it has the import tick of approval.

Consumers sell second-hand electrical equipment all of the time. Who polices that? How do they know I used it to make Australian toast? Do I need to test and tag my toaster before I sell it to my mother-in-law? I forgot to mention that my red toaster has a built-in radio.

To those of the general population who are reading this. Post an acknowledgement if you now have questions or concerns regarding the use of any electrical equipment whether that be for electrical consumption on or off grid. Do you think the Australian Federal Government should take complete statutory jurisdiction of all legislation and unify electrical use and safety in this country with a single set of regulations? A single Australian compliance mark that everyone recognises? Consistent Federal Legislation beyond Australian Standards that were written to guide the States with their independent legislation. By which the States would cede their jurisdiction control and allow for the complete Federalisation of a single unified Electricity Law. The application of Federal Electricity Law to encourage better public awareness and to promote other Federal Government initiatives, such as tighter importation and border control? Perhaps even go so far as to foster innovation incentive and rekindle "Made in Australia" once again?

Do you really think a meter is causing your sleep apnoea? And that it has caused your consumption to go up 33%?

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I found this interesting, Silicon Chip tried to help us have things changed for us back in 2001, but seems it was unsuccessful http://archive.siliconchip.com.au/cms/A_101731/article.html

 

I guess the title here is true :P

http://archive.siliconchip.com.au/cms/A_110635/article.html

 

Edit: I'm surprised they let us change light bulbs in QLD

Rules are rules and they are there to comply with. Electrical wiring needs to be at the minimum standards set and no less. It's all about safety and staying alive. If there wasn't any rules or regulation you will have manufacturers and suppliers providing substandard products and services that can be potentially hazards. There are many in organisation who "don't give a rats" and will give you the cheapest substandard product or service with the don't care attitude. It's this attitude that Electrical Board and Work Safe Victoria are stamping out. And when there is an issue where it's lethal or in the case of property being damaged due to the work performed, you zero in on the cause and then we all realised it's all preventable. Look at the botch insulation scandal, there where no outline on standard of work so the results speaks for itself.

When I was at the HiFi show this year I notice one exhibitor having the cover off a valve amp with all it's 240 wiring and high voltage DC exposed plugged in an operation! Waiting to tell the exhibitor the issue at hand I lost concentration when I bumped and came across 2 people who took me outside the room. I can't believe the response of some posters here at SNA when I mentioned this and some of them have kids as well. This Show was a public event where kids enter for free and I'm sure if there was an incident these posters would be the first to arc up and sue accordingly. See my point, that's why we have to have regulation for electrical and plumbing standards.

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