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Apparently I will be seeing him in full mono on Monday. Would of preferred the Tivoli venue, but beggars cant be chooses. I'll be up the back row somewhere. Hope its good. :)

Don't forget the review

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I have been playing most my Bob Dylan mono box set with my recently cheap arse mono Y cable, and damned if I say.  It does sound better played via mono than stereo.  Not sure how it will sound via a mono cartrigde vs mono switch or Y cablw

 

  Any one else got a mono cart?

I play this mono box with a stereo cart - sounds pretty good.
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  I have been playing most my Bob Dylan mono box set with my recently cheap arse mono Y cable, and damned if I say.  It does sound better played via mono than stereo.  Not sure how it will sound via a mono cartrigde vs mono switch or Y cablw

 

  Any one else got a mono cart?

 

 

sounding brilliant through the miyajima mono cart

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Bastard John!   :)          the mono is supposed to be their best sounding cart.

 

it is a brilliant cart and matched very well with the ortofon arm and lh-9000 headshell

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here's something truly exciting

anything to do with Bob Dylan new records is exciting

in the past long before the internet the expectation was high even when not always matched by the actual record

in the last decade or 2 the release of anything to do with his Bootleg Series has been everything fanatics could want and even though the series 8 sounded a bit dull the reality far exceeded the expectation

but now comes the holy grail of all Bob's unreleased songs 

The Basement Tapes all 138 songs in 6 cds and even though i don't like  looking forward in time( i like to look back at last week) i can't wait for Nov 

here is what Rolling Stone magazine said in 68

 

 

By Jann S. Wenner |  June 22, 1968

Two months before he went to Nashville to record John Wesley Harding, Bob Dylan spent some time in the basement of his upstate New York home. There he made a rough but very listenable tape with thirteen songs.

There is enough material — most all of it very good — to make an entirely new Bob Dylan record, a record with a distinct style of its own. Although it is highly unlikely that Dylan would want to go into the studio to record material that is now seven or eight months old, nonetheless these tapes could easily be remastered and made into a record. The concept of a cohesive record is already present.

Whatever the original intention of the session, what happened was that Dylan and his band made a demo, a collection of songs vaguely arranged and fitted to instrumentals, for other artists to audition to see if they would like to record any of the material. One of the songs on the tape — "Quinn the Eskimo" or "The Mighty Quinn" — reached the top position on radio surveys in a version by the English group Manfred Mann. Another of them, and one of the best —"This Wheel's On Fire" — has just been released in England in a version by British vocalist Julie Driscoll and organist Brian Auger. Their version is supposed to be quite good and will probably be released shortly in the United States.

500 Greatest Albums of All Time: The Basement Tapes

The group backing Dylan on this tape is called the Crackers. Formerly they were the Hawks. The band, which lives with Dylan at his home, consists of Levon Helm on drums, Rick Danko on bass and Robbie Robertson on guitar. They accompanied him at Carnegie Hall for the recent Woody Guthrie Memorial program. Robbie Robertson has been working with Dylan for the past three years.

The instrumentation is closest to Blonde on Blonde, including an organ, an electric bass, drums and two guitars, accoustic and electric. The singing is more closely related to John Wesley Harding, however. The style is typically Dylan: humorous, rock-and-rolly with repetitious patterns. One of the things peculiar to this tape is that Dylan is working with a group; there is more interaction between him and the instrumentalists than can be seen in any of his other efforts, plus there is vocal backup in the choruses from his band.

The quality of the recording is fairly poor, it was a one-track, one-take job with all the instruments recorded together. The highs and lows are missing, but Dylan's voice is clear and beautiful. Additionally the tape has probably gone through several dozen dubs, each one losing a little more quality.

Here is a summary of some of the songs:

Million Dollar Bash: In the background of all Dylan's material is the style of rock and roll, and in this song is the sing-songy tune and the "ooo-baby, ooohh-weee, ooo-baby oooh-weee" chorus. The song is just a funny one, about people who run around like chickens with their heads cut off ("I get up in the morning, but it's too early to wake") trying to get someplace or other, including a good party, like the Million Dollar Bash where everybody ends up anyway.

Yea Heavy and a Bottle of Bread: This will probably not be recorded by anyone, because it isn't terribly good. The imagery is Highway 61, the melody non-existent. ("The comic book and me caught the bus, then the chauffer she was back in bed.")

Please Mrs. Henry starts out like a Johnny Cash song, a tale about a poor cat without a dime and with too much to drink. ("I'm a sweet bourbon daddy and tonight I am blue.") It is indicative of where Dylan was headed because it's about a man who's hit some hard times and needs a little help. The song is a sort of swaying "Rainy Day Women" number, but without all the laughing and hoopla.

Down In The Flood: Flatt & Scruggs did this song. In Dylan's version the organist makes a lot of dancing figures around Dylan's vocal. It has the potential of being a great swinging rock and roll song, capable of sustaining a lot of tension between the rhythm and the vocal. The potential for a rock and roll treatment is not at all coincidental, as the theme is very much reminiscent of "Like a Rolling Stone" and "Positively Fourth Street," in that the subject is about a chick ("Mama") who let the singer down and will have to "find another best friend now." The statement and drama is not as harsh as those previous songs, in fact much milder in style, words and situation, but it is the familiar set-up.

Tiny Montgomery: The lyric strategy here is rather diffuse, about telling everybody in "old Frisco" that "Tiny Montgomery says 'Hello'." "Everybody" is a collection of rather moderate freaks and non-descripts, and one can't help thinking that Dylan is taking cognizance of some of the more publicized aspects of San Francisco. The organ in this song does several hard-to-hear electronic bits and the vocal is backed a continual high-pitched chorus.

100 Greatest Artists of All Time: Bob Dylan

This Wheel's On Fire: A little Del Shannon piano in the beginning tips off the most dramatic and moving vocal by Dylan in this collection. The drums become clear for the first time on this song. It is a great number, possibly the very best by this group.

"This wheel's on fire/Rolling down the road;/ Just notify my next of kin/This wheel shall explode."

The song is a very passionate love story ("You know we shall meet again/If your memory serves you well") about a woman who must inevitably return bound by a fate, to the man she has neglected but who has done everything he possibly can for her.

The style here is close to J. W. Harding, the aching and yearning is soul wrenchingly intense.

Ain't Goin' Nowhere: "Get your mind off wintertime." This song like many of the others and much of John Wesley Harding could be characterized as part of Dylan's continuing advice to calm down, smile on your brother, let's get together . . .

I Shall Be Released: Curiously enough the music in this song and the high pleading sound of Dylan's voice reminds one of the Bee Gees. It is one of the few songs on the tape with an instrumental break. "They say every man needs protection/They say every man must fall/ Yet I swear I see my reflection/Someplace so high above this wall."

Tears of Rage: This is a very sad and a very confusing song. I'm sure you will understand it when it is recorded and released by some artist. "Why must I always be the one."

Quinn the Eskimo is familiar to most in the version by Manfred Mann. Dylan does the song slower, does use flutes, but doesn't make the great differentiation between the verse and the chorus. "Mighty Quinn" is the most obvious of these songs to give a full-blown rock and roll treatment.

Open the Door Richard: "Take care of all of your memories/For you can not relive them;/And re-remember when you're out there/You must always first forgive them." This is a light, swinging song.

Nothing Is There: If this doesn't prove Dylan's sense of humor, little will. This sounds like 1956 vintage rock and roll; the piano triplets (Dylan himself playing, I'm sure) are a direct cop from Fats Domino's "Blueberry Hill." Dylan is one of the few rock and roll artists who uses both a piano and an organ.

The last song gives interesting insight into the nature of this unreleased Dylan material. Even though he used one of the finest rock and roll bands ever assembled on the Highway 61 album, here he works with his own band, for the first time. Dylan brings that instinctual feel for rock and roll to his voice for the first time. If this were ever to be released, it would be a classic.

This story is from the June 22nd, 1968 issue of Rolling Stone.

From The Archives Issue 12: June 22, 1968

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/dylans-basement-tape-should-be-released-19680622#ixzz3BZQcdbuD 
Follow us: @rollingstone on Twitter | RollingStone on Facebook

Edited by keyse1
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Does anyone have the MOFI pressings of

 

Blood on the Tracks

Desire

Basement Tapes

 

 

I have mid 80's CBS Holland  and UK pressings which don't sound too bad.  Wondering if it is worthwhile buying the MOFI while they are still reasonable prices. Fremer reckons they are amazing, but

 

 

cheers

Edited by metal beat
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Does anyone have the MOFI pressings of

Blood on the Tracks

Desire

Basement Tapes

I have mid 80's CBS Holland and UK pressings which don't sound too bad. Wondering if it is worthwhile buying the MOFI while they are still reasonable prices. Fremer reckons they are amazing, but

cheers

@ I have the mofi for the first and last, not desire.

Yes they are great sounding, but I do not own other pressings and so can't report on the difference.

I have found all mofi pressings to be great but occasionally find that while their pressing may be 'technically' better, sometimes they lose a bit in some areas. Eg The Cars self titled is quieter and maybe more accurate, but lost a bit of mid slam and punch.

If it were me and I was not happy with my older copies I'd do it.

Glad you posted this query, I'm gonna listen to them again tonight now...

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@, Shane I have Blood & Desire, both sound very good particularly Desire but the only vinyl comparison I have is the AU Masterpieces I bought back when, hardly a fair comp.  You're welcome to borrow them (plus Blonde on Blonde box) if that helps :) (Hwy 61 will arrive next week)

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@, Shane I have Blood & Desire, both sound very good particularly Desire but the only vinyl comparison I have is the AU Masterpieces I bought back when, hardly a fair comp.  You're welcome to borrow them (plus Blonde on Blonde box) if that helps :) (Hwy 61 will arrive next week)

 

@@David.M

 

Desire turned up today.  After throwing away the awful mofi plastic and cardbioard inner sleeves and giving it a US clean with the KLA.

 

You guys are correct.  As nice as my Euro pressing sounds, this mofi release just sounds better in every respect

 

Highly recommended

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@, good to know I didn't give you a bum steer, you really don't like those nice rice paper sleeves do you :)

 

My Hwy 61 arrived during the week and it to sounds really nice, I'm tempted but think I will stay with the mono's for the earlier albums.

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Why was Abandoned Love left off Desire  - because its Bob Dylan of course. :)

 

It is on the Biograph 5 lp box set and it says he recorded for Desire, but cut in favor of Joey - fair enough

 

Why did he leave "You're a Big Girl Now"off Blood on the Tracks?

 

I think that is why his "Bootleg"series is so good - plenty of great songs that never made it to any album.

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Why was Abandoned Love left off Desire  - because its Bob Dylan of course. :)

 

It is on the Biograph 5 lp box set and it says he recorded for Desire, but cut in favor of Joey - fair enough

 

Why did he leave "You're a Big Girl Now"off Blood on the Tracks?

 

I think that is why his "Bootleg"series is so good - plenty of great songs that never made it to any album.

 

 

You're a Big Girl Now is on BOTT.  ;)

 

Good subject,and I recall all the brilliant stuff (it  turned up on Bootleg Vol 8) that was  left off Oh Mercy. Series Of Dreams would have gone close to being the best song on that album.

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Joey is not such a good song but Abandoned Love is a great song

I would imagine it to be a bit tricky trying to tell Bob he's got it wrong

Not to mention cheeky

Your'e a big Girl Now on Biograph from memory is the original version that was re recorded when he went home for Xmas

From what I read the next Bootleg Series next year will be the original version of Blood On The Tracks

Golden Loom is another great song left off Desire and the albums that followed

There is a book about the making of Blood On The Tracks that I have as an ebook written by Andy Gill

Worth reading and doesn't cost much

Edited by keyse1
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Damm, At least two people reading and both know Dylan better than myself - no shame in that as I am a novice compared to some    :welcome: -  different unreleased version is on Biograph  - A better one imo.

 

all these different versions that are on tape is another reason why Bob is so good.

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Different words too I think

Also released on bootleg series is the original Idiot Wind

I have all the released original versions listed as extras on the computer

Try this

Play the original Idiot Wind a gentle ballad with breakup criticism in the words

Then the released version faster more angry

And then play Idiot Wind from Hard Rain a live vitriolic tirade against his wife

The most hostile song I have ever heard

Even tops Richard Thompson for nastiness

All 3 versions have different words but the way the song changes in sound and intent is what makes it so interesting

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Bob is the interest that just keeps on giving and well worthy of my over the top obsession

But I am not one of those fans that has been written about

They aren't just over the top but over the moon

One of the few rock players that to really appreciate you need some knowledge of his life to make sense of the twists and turns that the music and sound have taken over the decades

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  • 2 weeks later...

Keyse and Soundfan - partners are not home today?     I don't know any wife that likes Bob Dylan and his voice :D     I am always consigned to playing Bob at night time or when she is not home.

 

Lol. Yep, you are correct Shane. The better half just left home for the arvo, so time to play some Bob. There's just no understanding women sometimes.  ;)

 

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It happens to be my favourite "live" Dylan. I regret not picking it up on vinyl at time of release, but have the CD box, and also a 7 1/2 IPS reel tape which is "reeling" now.

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Keyse and Soundfan - partners are not home today?     I don't know any wife that likes Bob Dylan and his voice :D     I am always consigned to playing Bob at night time or when she is not home.

That is both funny and true

Like sound fan my wife hates Bob

I'm down in garage she's in hiding

Probably doing something constructive

The problem with playing Dylan records is that it can be hard to stop

I'm still on the Self Portrait Bootleg

Uh oh doors just been shut

post-141610-0-68516900-1411268982_thumb.

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