Jump to content
IGNORED

Hearing Aids for Hi-Fi (split)


Recommended Posts

This is a seriously depressing discussion 😅

 

Does anyone have any hearing aid suggestions ? Of course it must have a tight bass, sweet midrange and smooth treble.

What about down sizing high end system to fit into a nursing home room?  What would you bring?

 

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites


14 hours ago, Tony@melb said:

This is a seriously depressing discussion 😅

 

Does anyone have any hearing aid suggestions ? Of course it must have a tight bass, sweet midrange and smooth treble.

What about down sizing high end system to fit into a nursing home room?  What would you bring?

 

 

Hearing aids are generally for speech intelligibility.  Looking on the bright side headphones are the answer for the ageing music lover from what Ive seen from helping my grand father. He was a massive music lover and musician who had a sizeable vinyl collection and the usual racks of expensive gear. Then his hearing slowly went as WW2 hearing damage took over but he couldn't part with his wonderful collection which just  got in the way. Getting him into IT and headphones gave him some good years.

 

Headphones via a DAC with computer audio allow the oldies to enjoy music by:

decluttering  - sell off all that gear so it can be enjoyed by others before its obsolete and only good for a skip

stream - no vinyl/CD/HD collection to maintain

high volume listening without annoying others

massive equalisation individually adjusted for each ear to accommodate the specific hearing loss

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Nada said:

Headphones

 

22 hours ago, Rosco8 said:

 

Now to finish my years with a Walkman I find really sad and depressing

 

The very last thing I hope that I am reduced to is bloody headphones. I have never truly been a fan but the year I spent in hospital with no other option really, REALLY put me off them for music listening.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites


On 28/10/2021 at 10:16 AM, Tony@melb said:

This is a seriously depressing discussion 😅

 

Does anyone have any hearing aid suggestions ? Of course it must have a tight bass, sweet midrange and smooth treble.

What about down sizing high end system to fit into a nursing home room?  What would you bring?

 

 

Michael Fremer did a review a couple of years ago on a hearing aid for listening to speakers. It is on his website. Not sure where.

Link to comment
Share on other sites


On 02/11/2021 at 10:31 AM, Wimbo said:

Michael Fremer did a review a couple of years ago on a hearing aid for listening to speakers. It is on his website. Not sure where.

Fremer's review was October last year I think...this one?  https://www.analogplanet.com/content/two-months-widexs-moment-440-mric-r-d-hearing-aids

 

A couple of years ago I started wearing hearing aids...Starkey Livio.  One of the first things I did when I got them home was turn on the music.  My hearing loss would be considered mild.  Difference in music was astounding (and still is).

  • Like 7
Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, Southerly said:

Blairy, 

I wish I had heard about this marque before my wife went to an audative shop. Sh goes for her final visit before paying and there is an intermittent problem - on e day she hears well and the nex it's all muffled. Hearing problems don't work like that, it's definitely the aids. Luckily she can hear music via the h/phones. TV doesn't sound right or good just OK, high pitched voices especially women sound the worst.

I'd take them back and get them checked/tested.  I've never experienced it but understand that muffled audio with hearing aids is likely a battery issue.  In this case, perhaps the battery isn't fitted correctly?  And that can be issue with replaceable and rechargable batteries too.

 

Cheers

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites


17 hours ago, Southerly said:

Blairy, 

I wish I had heard about this marque before my wife went to an audative shop. Sh goes for her final visit before paying and there is an intermittent problem - on e day she hears well and the nex it's all muffled. Hearing problems don't work like that, it's definitely the aids. Luckily she can hear music via the h/phones. TV doesn't sound right or good just OK, high pitched voices especially women sound the worst.

If you are sure it is the aids, then don't pay anything 'til they are right. If they won't comply just walk away and check your rights under consumer law.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

blairy,

they have the rechargeable batteries. We have another appointment and if nec. they will be checked by a technician. There was no hassle in the shop today  and I reckon that problems with what is micro-electronics of hearing aids is probably quite common. They are Opticon and this firm also do the Starkey's as well but we weren't shown these.

 

Greg, France is good for consumer law. Years ago now the consumer orgs. challenged the guarantees of washing machines and fridges and the EU upheld their point So the 2 or 3 years aren't valid and the EU reckons that these products should be good for 8-10 years.

We now have to replace our Sanyo microwave after 20 years. One of our go-to TV channels is NHK world, it's free-to-air and has lots of very interesting programmes. It was a few years ago now and I saw an interview with the then collapsed Sanyo company CEO. He was crying because he hadn't dropped the quality control standards as had other Japanese companies and so the company had collapsed and he apologised to all the employees _ I can't imagine for a moment that any UK CEO would do that.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 09/11/2021 at 9:09 PM, blairy said:

 

A couple of years ago I started wearing hearing aids...Starkey Livio.  One of the first things I did when I got them home was turn on the music.  My hearing loss would be considered mild.  Difference in music was astounding (and still is).

 

Blairy

 

I acquired a set of nuraphone in-ear phones, which detect the user's hearing ability and automatically adjust the output accordingly.  Big difference for someone older (I am 62) between with and without adjustment.

 

The Nuraphone also includes an image of the hearing spectrum.  I tried it with other older people I knew, who had systems with particular characteristics.  Who would have thought that their hearing deficiencies mirrored the way their system was set up.  They probably wanted exactly the same sound in their head as others might, but they needed a different combination of bass/mid-range/treble to achieve that than others.

 

So much for 'bass-heavy' or 'bright' systems.  It can depend on the ears of the listener.

 

Benje

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Benje said:

 

Blairy

 

I acquired a set of nuraphone in-ear phones, which detect the user's hearing ability and automatically adjust the output accordingly.  Big difference for someone older (I am 62) between with and without adjustment.

 

The Nuraphone also includes an image of the hearing spectrum.  I tried it with other older people I knew, who had systems with particular characteristics.  Who would have thought that their hearing deficiencies mirrored the way their system was set up.  They probably wanted exactly the same sound in their head as others might, but they needed a different combination of bass/mid-range/treble to achieve that than others.

 

So much for 'bass-heavy' or 'bright' systems.  It can depend on the ears of the listener.

 

Benje

 

Wow!!!  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

I went to a wedding party and the music was so loud that I could hardly hear anything from the person next to me. I measured the noise level and it was close to 100db. Having a hearing aid that can distill the noise on such occasion would be a good thing. Perhaps @Benje nuraphone can do that?   At this rate, young people who go to these parties probably need their hearing aids much sooner than us. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 11/11/2021 at 2:48 PM, Benje said:

 

Blairy

 

I acquired a set of nuraphone in-ear phones, which detect the user's hearing ability and automatically adjust the output accordingly.  Big difference for someone older (I am 62) between with and without adjustment.

 

The Nuraphone also includes an image of the hearing spectrum.  I tried it with other older people I knew, who had systems with particular characteristics.  Who would have thought that their hearing deficiencies mirrored the way their system was set up.  They probably wanted exactly the same sound in their head as others might, but they needed a different combination of bass/mid-range/treble to achieve that than others.

 

So much for 'bass-heavy' or 'bright' systems.  It can depend on the ears of the listener.

 

Benje

All recent Samsung phones have a built in hearing test and  after the test is done the phone alters the sound as per the test. It would do wonders for someone with hearing loss in certain frequencies.....

Edited by gillmaverick
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

After reading Fremer's review, i feel lucky that my first hearing aids were Widex. I saw a specialist and asked him what he recommended, his comment was to research on the internet. The Widex brand seemed to fit what i was looking for in hearing aids, when told the price, $8000 i said reviews mentioned to not pay inital price but to negotiate, the price dropped to $7000 without issue, these lasted 5yrs.

In that time my situation had changed and i was eligable for government funded hearing aids, my audiologist said they would be better than my first set due to advances in technology, not quite , but for the $7000 diffeence they are fantastic, would recommend Widex to anyone needing hearing aids.

Edited by wen
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hearing aids do not sound the death knell of hifi listening.
 

It's not cheap, though…


I'm 63, have moderate to severe hearing loss above about 2kHz and have been wearing hearing aids for 5 years.

 

My first pair were close enough to AU$10k. They were Sigma, Pure Primax 7px and had a wider bandwidth than any other hearing aids and several specially calibrated music listening programs you could change via your smartphone. They were very good initially but deteriorated in SQ over time (my system wasn’t sounding like I knew it could in the end), so I recently trialled and bought a new pair of Opticon More 1's. They also have a specialised music program (AU$8k…)

 

And, WOW. My system has never sounded as good. 


One hurdle is the cost.

 

The other significant hurdle is finding an audiologist that actually understands the significance of listening to music and will work with you to optimise the settings to maximise the musical enjoyment you can get. Shop around. Talk to the audiologist about your needs. Finding the right person is half the battle. 

 

These links might help:

https://musicandhearingaids.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/35/2018/10/Music-listening-with-hearing-aids-Version-2.0-24-Sept-2018.pdf

 

https://musicandhearingaids.org/

 

Regards,

Peter

Edited by PeterB7858
Typo
  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
22 hours ago, Tony@melb said:

I hear that audiology clinic at University of Melbourne is good

 

I can attest to this. This is where I ended up in my search to find an audiologist that understood people with a passion for playing and listening to high quality music.

A couple of their staff are practising musicians.

https://healthsciences.unimelb.edu.au/audiology-speech-pathology-clinic/about/team-members 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have direct experience with circuitry involved with hearing aids, and can inform very little is done to make the circuitry linear, but its not hard to do so. Simple principles of feedback can transform a hearing aid, to be a spectacular audio device. Such linearity needs to suit the characteristics of your hearing ability.

 

I would advise making maximum use of your public health cover... without necessarily having to resort to,  paid for health insurance, to book as many appointments as you can, to discuss your needs with a range of audiologists.

 

It is invariably that magnification of low level sounds is needed, rather than just making everything louder.  http://edgarvillchur.com/hearing-aids/

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

When it became apparent that my wife's hearing was declining I checked out (Europe) the production cost of hearing aids. What a shock this was. There are 3 companies making hearing aids in Europe/Scandinavia and the average cost of (1) hearing aid is - €15 yes that's right €15 a piece.

 

The audiologist is French but language wasn't the problem, my wife was. She doesn't like being put on the spot (childhood problems) and gave vague answers. 

 

When I fit her hearing aids I have to make her answer on a score of 1-10 for each ear. I shall have to make an RDV/appointment  to get her aids function much better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

www.indiegogo.com/projects/olivemax

 

I think it's worth anyone with hearing problems to check these out. A pair will cost US$549 + shipping and import tax, 20% on purchase price ans shipping cost. My wife had to pay €2,200 for a pair.

 

On the basis that 'you can't take it with you' I think I will shell out for a pair, music is one of her loves.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Apologies to all for my last post. As always look for user reviews. Apparently the previous model was crap, I don't imagine the newer model will be much better.

 

Chris (S/C) I am going to arrange another RDV with my wife's audiologist but if need be I shall pay to see others, being able tyo listen to her music would be a real boon to her mental well being.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I recently got the basic Aids thru now being a pensioner and they are great. Beltones. Two settings atm. One for noisy environment's and one for music. My problem is midrange and treble are down 20% and these compensate beautifully.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

My hearing aids are Signia Stilleto 7. They aren't cheap at $7.5k, but they do a great job. Originally a company owned by Siemens, they hold all the rights to the technology that Siemens developed. A phone app allows several programs to be used, more than can be loaded onto the app/aids, so you choose which is best for you. I have the regular hearing program, along with one to cancel out reverberation from echoey environments, and music listening. The sound I get is truely 3D. If a bird is chirping in a tree to my left rear, that's where I perceive it to come from through the aids. The music program is quite good too, I think it mainly expands the dynamic range. Realism is exceptional, nothing ever sound artificial. There is also the ability to cancel out sounds from particularly noisy directions, eg; talking in a noisy pub you are able to cancel out noise coming from any direction other than the person you are conversing with. Driving on a noisy road, you can concentrate the hearing towards your partner for clearer speach recognition. Or away if she's nagging. Phone calls and music can be direct streamed via Bluetooth. Hearing aids have come a long way since the old basic amplifier tech.

 

How they compare to other brands I have no idea, these are my first aids. I  highly doubt they will be seen as a slouch though. A dedicated music aid shoud be better I would think.

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites


 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.




×
×
  • Create New...
To Top