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A couple questions about 230/240v from a confused person


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I've been chasing a transformer hum/buz in my DAC, emitting from the transformer itself inside the unit.

It lead me to being a bit confused about power in New Zealand and Australia. I purchased the item as a 230 market item (Aus, NZ, EU). The outlets on my wall measure at 241v, yet NZ is listed as a 230 country in this wikipedia listing. So I'm wondering, why is there a dependency here. And now I'm wondering if I buy a power conditioner and set it to condition down to a stable 230 this might actually solve some my transformer hum/buz problem because the transformer could be working extra to offset the extra 11v it's getting. Or maybe I'm just confused...


 

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Edited by ColdsnapBry
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I may be wrong since I’m not a qualified electrician, but i doubt a 5% difference in voltage is going to introduce transformer hum. I doubt power conditioning would fix that.

 

might want to look at the transformer itself. Could it be faulty or maybe it’s not screwed down properly? 

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1 hour ago, silencer13 said:

I may be wrong since I’m not a qualified electrician, but i doubt a 5% difference in voltage is going to introduce transformer hum. I doubt power conditioning would fix that.

 

might want to look at the transformer itself. Could it be faulty or maybe it’s not screwed down properly? 


I think you could be right too.. I have two of the same transformers inside an Asgard 3 and a Schiit Bifrost 2 and both hum, both seem to be bolted down properly. 5% might not be enough, but some of these big transformers can be sensitive:

 

image.png.a51c20121722f2188645f6141d971fc5.png

 

56 minutes ago, Batty said:

DC on the power?

 

I used a DC blocker from a friend and that didn't help.

 

Edited by ColdsnapBry
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Hi Guys,

There's a similar thread here: 

Anecdotally, there has been a lot of comment about US made transformers (ie 120V) in chassis that use voltage converters to 230/240. AUS started to convert to the EU standard of 230V in the 80's. Not sure if engineers in the US caught up!! I enclose a pdf of AUS voltage variations federally (216-253V) but managed by state. And my goodness what a state! 

https://www.ewh.ieee.org/r10/nsw/subpages/history/Australian-AC-Line-Voltages.pdf

This is why many of us use some form of power regeneration or filtering. Not just for protection from spikes/outages. 

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Schiit gear are notorious for not grounding the metal works that will cause hum.   This is a good thing we have this site that shows the issues of some gear.

 

 

https://www.audiosciencereview.com/forum/index.php?threads/schiit-saga-grounding-and-hum-issues.4737/


 

if you have Valve gear that stick out of the box like most do, this will also be susceptible to 50hz “hum”     
if your volume pot case isn’t grounded or the chassis isn’t grounded correctly on any audio component has the potential to give you hum.

 

putting a 230VAC rated component on a measured 240VAC will unlikely cause “hum”.    

 

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3 hours ago, Addicted to music said:

Schiit gear are notorious for not grounding the metal works that will cause hum.   This is a good thing we have this site that shows the issues of some gear.

 

 

https://www.audiosciencereview.com/forum/index.php?threads/schiit-saga-grounding-and-hum-issues.4737/


 

if you have Valve gear that stick out of the box like most do, this will also be susceptible to 50hz “hum”     
if your volume pot case isn’t grounded or the chassis isn’t grounded correctly on any audio component has the potential to give you hum.

 

putting a 230VAC rated component on a measured 240VAC will unlikely cause “hum”.    

 


Ok, this sounds similar to my problem but I think they were hearing the hum through headphones. Schiit also has asked me to simply ship it back to them in the United States, ignoring that they distribute to my area and shipping it to them then back to myself would cost another $200 USD.

Edited by ColdsnapBry
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3 hours ago, BlueOceanBoy said:

Hi Guys,

There's a similar thread here: 

Anecdotally, there has been a lot of comment about US made transformers (ie 120V) in chassis that use voltage converters to 230/240. AUS started to convert to the EU standard of 230V in the 80's. Not sure if engineers in the US caught up!! I enclose a pdf of AUS voltage variations federally (216-253V) but managed by state. And my goodness what a state! 

https://www.ewh.ieee.org/r10/nsw/subpages/history/Australian-AC-Line-Voltages.pdf

This is why many of us use some form of power regeneration or filtering. Not just for protection from spikes/outages. 


Maybe I need to find a filtering device where I can set it to output at a stable 230V...

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7 hours ago, ColdsnapBry said:


I think you could be right too.. I have two of the same transformers inside an Asgard 3 and a Schiit Bifrost 2 and both hum, both seem to be bolted down properly. 5% might not be enough, but some of these big transformers can be sensitive:

 

image.png.a51c20121722f2188645f6141d971fc5.png

 

 

I used a DC blocker from a friend and that didn't help.

 


I don’t see that transformer bolted anywhere in that picture, it looks like the wires are through the hole and soldered under the pcb and that’s it!   Looking at other Asgard, it’s the same thing.   The picture shows  the label with the numeric 01-240 REV B Bifrost 2 suggest not confirmed that it’s a 240V transformer….  Other pictures on the net search comes up with the same transformer with the numeric 01-205 and I’m assuming that’s for the US running 110.

 

Again, just because it’s a 230VAC  and  actual 240 is doubtful it makes it hum.   So the question is does it hum at night too?   If it does it’s nothing to do with the voltage as mains supply will drop slightly during the night unless there is something wrong with the grid.  
Also send and email and asked Schiit the question:  is the transformer rated at 240V quoting what is on the label.

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10 hours ago, ColdsnapBry said:

I purchased the item as a 230 market item (Aus, NZ, EU). The outlets on my wall measure at 241v, yet NZ is listed as a 230 country in this wikipedia listing.

Australia is a 230V AC country that has 240V 😉

The 230V standard was brought about, because manufacturers were disappointed they had to make separate stuff for 220V countries and 240V countries.

The thing is though, that Australia is big, and to get 230V at the end of the line, they pump a bit more. To really fix it, a lot more substations would have to be build and this cost money.

@Addicted to music is right that the 10V extra will not make the trafo hum.

Recently, I had a severe hum in Conrad-Johnson  CD transport. By severe, I mean it was as loud as quiet conversation.

Similar situation to yours: the trafo had no screws and core plates were only held by varnish and with time they got loose.

So I fitted bolts and nuts to holes at every corner, tightened them, removed the solder from trafo pins undereath, pressed it down to the board and re-soldered.

Hum is gone.

There was a very good set of long nose pliers recently at Aldi. They had the tip curved, and this helped in holding the nuts while the bolts were turned. But you might have to take the board out, for it looks very crowded there at the back of the unit.

Hope it helps

Roman

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