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Post some pics thread...


warnsey1

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15 hours ago, buddyev said:

No, it’s not realistic to process colour at home. 

Why not shoot transparencies? You’re in complete control of how the image will look by your exposure. It’s a different approach from either digital or negatives. There’s no latitude and it really teaches you the finer points of exposure. 
I can see the fun in  B&W - you have control of the whole thing, but TBH shooting colour negative seems quite pointless to me. 


The point of going back to film is to experience the medium as it is. I don’t want to spend time trying to make film look like digital, or make digital look like film. Have been evaluating the pics I took on Kodak 200 and I’m actually starting to like them. 

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Yes, of course.

My point is that  you can't get the best out of what's in an individual colour exposure if you have to depend on someone else's machine printing.  Unless its individually custom printed it's always going to be what they think it should look like. That's why I personally would find it unsatisfying to go back to. 

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Your House is on Fire.

Darkroom print on Ilford new, dodge and burn, selective bleaching, refix and selenium.
HP5 4x5 in pyro hd
Linhof Tecknica, 150mm lens.

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12 hours ago, buddyev said:

Yes, of course.

My point is that  you can't get the best out of what's in an individual colour exposure if you have to depend on someone else's machine printing.  Unless its individually custom printed it's always going to be what they think it should look like. That's why I personally would find it unsatisfying to go back to. 

I used to get great results processing my own transparencies and printing from them, but never did colour negatives.

 

Now I just can't be bothered, it's a chore and no longer a creative process. I don't even play much with digital images, I focus on the taking, not the changing. Of course anybody should do their creations to satisfy themselves.

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Reworked a colour shot I like of the A2 steam locomotive between Echuca and Bendigo earlier this year using NIK Silver filters. 

 

FA2A4448_Nik_DxO_DxO.jpg

Edited by Rosco8
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I was a hand colour printer for quite a few years in a pro colour lab. I used to get to print the very highest quality stuff, which was great and also the worst - trying to salvage important shots that the photographer had butchered through under exposure. 

But I always shot Kodachrome for fun.  Transparencies teach exposure discipline - what you shoot is what you get.  

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All the fun is in the darkroom, wouldn't even bother taking photos without one.

This is my new one.....well will be eventually. 

20210823_140947.jpg.bf6f7189668ce87e3fa8f8e618c1143c.jpg

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4 hours ago, Rosco8 said:

Reworked a colour shot I like of the A2 steam locomotive between Echuca and Bendigo earlier this year using NIK Silver filters. 

 

FA2A4448_Nik_DxO_DxO.jpg

Great work, looks far more energetic.

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Some random shots on a different film. This time I tried Kodak Cinefilm 250D. I'm happy with how sharp it is. Seems to be low  grain as well. Was thinking there was going to be some weird yellow or green cast over them but the colours are pretty natural.

order 00270-36.jpg

order 00270-1.jpg

order 00270-5.jpg

order 00270-21.jpg

order 00270-35.jpg

Edited by deviltoob
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On 23/08/2021 at 7:24 PM, buddyev said:

No, it’s not realistic to process colour at home. 

Why not shoot transparencies? You’re in complete control of how the image will look by your exposure. It’s a different approach from either digital or negatives. There’s no latitude and it really teaches you the finer points of exposure. 
I can see the fun in  B&W - you have control of the whole thing, but TBH shooting colour negative seems quite pointless to me. 

I used to think this, but to be honest, it’s really the same plus it’s actually quicker than some B&W processing! All you need is a big bucket from kmart or something that you can fill with hot water from Tap that you adjust with cold / hot water to come to the temp you need and you’re all set! 

 

These colour and B&W pics below are all home processed and scan with a DSLR, all at home. I normally was able to turn over the pictures within couple of days for the models that need them. 

 

https://www.instagram.com/atya_35mm/

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1 hour ago, atya said:

I used to think this, but to be honest, it’s really the same plus it’s actually quicker than some B&W processing! All you need is a big bucket from kmart or something that you can fill with hot water from Tap that you adjust with cold / hot water to come to the temp you need and you’re all set! 

 

These colour and B&W pics below are all home processed and scan with a DSLR, all at home. I normally was able to turn over the pictures within couple of days for the models that need them. 

 

https://www.instagram.com/atya_35mm/

So do you process the negs and print from the negative in an enlarger?
Or are you scanning the negative into a digital file? 

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46 minutes ago, buddyev said:

So do you process the negs and print from the negative in an enlarger?
Or are you scanning the negative into a digital file? 

Process the negs using c41 chemicals.

 

Scanned with an Epson V850. Sometimes with a DSLR fitted with a macro 50mm lens off a light table. Probably more finicky that way. 

 

Haven’t gone down to dark room printing, but tried it once at a workshop for B&W. Reckon it will be challenging to setup proper dark room at home so didn’t bother. 

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