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How to access cables with wall mount TV?


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Having moved recently, I'm looking for a new wall mount for the plasma TV, but I want one with more rear access.

 

Previously the TV (50in Panasonic) was on a tilting wall mount that came with it when I bought it, but it was a PITA accessing the cables. The only way to do it, short of removing the TV from the mount, was to sit underneath it with my back to the wall and reach up through the very small gap between the back of the TV and the wall and try to get all the cables into the right sockets. And even this was only possible because there was no rack of equipment underneath it.

 

How do others access their cables on wall mounted TVs? I think the normal wall mounts don't allow much access, and the "full-motion" ones or the ones on articulated arms seem quite expensive (S$499 at Best). Soon the mount will cost more than the TV!

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Many people I know with wall-mounted sets just run all the wires beforehand, i.e. even if you're not using the input yet, just have a wire dangling down. This is particularly important for those who wall-mount on a feature wall, and have the wires actually embedded in the wall.

 

Of course, if you like to experiment with different cables often, then that's not an option...

 

 

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Not really though, I have one from Monoprice which can be pull out and push back.

But It didn't get to use it as the installation need more then one pairs of hand when mount it.

 

When the new Pioneer wall mount installation is on going, I asked them to hold on the I plug in all the inputs with cables and marking on it.

So, all my cables are dangling down from the TV. ;D

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Get an AVR to act as a switcher.  Then u only need 1 HDMI cable to the wall mount TV, plus one power cable.

 

Unless the AVR has a pass-through function where HDMI signals get passed even when the AVR is off (I think the current Denons have this), connecting this way means you have to turn on the AVR everytime you want to watch TV. For basic cable, this is a waste of electricity, and also makes it more complicated (need to switch source, etc).

 

For example, in my set-up I have my SCV connected directly to the TV since it's mostly for watching football and my kids' Playhouse Disney - no point turning on full HT system. My AVR only acts as switcher for my Oppo and AppleTV.

 

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Unless the AVR has a pass-through function where HDMI signals get passed even when the AVR is off (I think the current Denons have this), connecting this way means you have to turn on the AVR everytime you want to watch TV. For basic cable, this is a waste of electricity, and also makes it more complicated (need to switch source, etc).

 

Even the pass-through function seems to use a fair bit of electricity.  I was reading the specs on a Denon, which seemed to suggest that in standby consumption is about 2W, but with HDMI pass-through on it's 30W, which is quite a bit for a piece of kit that isn't actually actively doing much.

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Dont use HDMI just for cable TV thats only 1080i and can use the component with L&R sound for non amp usage then HDMI for AVR usage. Even then u will have to fully off the mains to the AVR as passthru would still be functioning. I could be wrong... its happened once or twice in the past :)

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Well, we're talking about a TV that draws an average of 519W according to the specs, plus kids who know only how to switch the TV on, but not how to switch it off, so saving electricity is tough  :)

 

Any suggestions for a cheap(ish) receiver that would suit this purpose?

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Dont use HDMI just for cable TV thats only 1080i and can use the component with L&R sound for non amp usage then HDMI for AVR usage. Even then u will have to fully off the mains to the AVR as passthru would still be functioning. I could be wrong... its happened once or twice in the past :)

 

Of course if your TV has multiple HDMI inputs, you can connect Hubstation HD (HDMI output) to one input, and your amp to the other input. At least you don't have so many wires from the TV to the Hubstation HD.

 

This assumes, of course, that you have a Hubstation HD.

 

 

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Even the pass-through function seems to use a fair bit of electricity.  I was reading the specs on a Denon, which seemed to suggest that in standby consumption is about 2W, but with HDMI pass-through on it's 30W, which is quite a bit for a piece of kit that isn't actually actively doing much.

 

actually 2W or 30W is not really a big diff if you put it in perspective...

if my calculation is correct, even if u on the hdmi pass-thru for 24 hours... it will cost like about 17 cents per day which is $5.2 for the whole month.

and this is provided u use the hdmi pass thru for 24x7

 

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Of course if your TV has multiple HDMI inputs, you can connect Hubstation HD (HDMI output) to one input, and your amp to the other input. At least you don't have so many wires from the TV to the Hubstation HD.

 

This assumes, of course, that you have a Hubstation HD.

 

Alas, no Hubstation HD. Will head down to Adelphi sometime and look for a receiver. Any suggestions welcome (even if it's about which receivers to avoid).

 

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