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PSChia - how is your DVD890


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The DVDR 890 has glowing reviews from users in Europe because of the recording quality even though the sets available there do not support PAL progressive playback of pre-recorded R2 dvds. Only those sets sold in Asia (Australia, HK, Singapore, etc) can play back PAL R2/R4 dvds progressively.

 

So far, my comments are:

 

Likes:

1. Recording Quality -

I bought the DVDR 890 mainly as a replacement for my SVHS VCR and for archiving my collection of VHS tapes onto dvds. In this respect, I am very satisfied with the DVDR 890 - its recording quality is superb - far better than even the SVHS recordings made by my SVHS recorder.

 

In SP (standard play) mode (2hr per DVD+R/RW), the recorded video quality is indistinguishable from the original broadcast and even surpasses it when it comes to stationary scenes because the recording has even less noise than the actual broadcast. And SP is not even the best recording mode - the HQ mode gives the best quality but due to the higher bit-rates, can only record 1 hr per disk.

 

2. Lots of inputs -

The DVDR 890 can record via composite, S-video, i-Link and even component video inputs which I have not seen in other brands of DVDRs. Just think of what you can do with another dvd player that has Macrovision disabled ;D. I wonder if it would record progressive scan signals via the component video inputs though ::)

 

3. Cheap media -

DVD+RW blanks are available at $14-19 each while DVD+R is available for $12.90 each. This is cheaper than other formats in Singapore though it is the other way round in the States. DVD+R blanks are however not as commonly available here as DVD-R and compared to the cost of DVD+RW, is still too expensive for me and I'm waiting for the price to drop some more before I start archiving my VHS tape collection.

 

4. Sage-Faroudja deinterlacer -

That the DVDR 890 has the Sage-Faroudja chipset is a bonus as it gives a dvd viewing picture quality that's indistinguishable from that of the Q50.

 

5. DVD+RW playback on normal dvd players -

The recorded DVD+RW can be played back on any dvd player without having to finalise it first unlike DVD-RW disks.

 

6. Contents Index Menu on recorded DVD+R/RWs

I really like the built-in contents index menu that is generated by the DVDR. It has picture thumbnails and descriptive text for each program recorded and they can be changed by the user as often as he likes, ie the user can select another scene from the recording as the representative picture thumbnail and can change the descriptive text to whatever he wants at any time.

 

Dislikes:

There are only 2 peeves as far as I'm concerned:

1. The DVDR 890 is not RCE compatible. However, I was told that Philips HK can make the sets sold there RCE compatible if the user brings his set in to the Service Centre there. Maybe, Philips Singapore can do the same too. I'm not particularly concerned in my case as I still have the Q50 which is RCE compatible.

 

2. The DVDR 890 only comes with co-axial digital output. I would have liked to have both optical and co-axial outputs. But this actually worked out quite OK in my case as I can still connect both my Q50 (using optical output) and the DVDR 890 (using co-axial output) to my Panasonic TAU GIGA TV at the same time.

 

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Hi,

 

thanks for the wonderful review.

 

With regards to recording, what type of recording modes does it have ?

LP, SP and HQ

How long is the LP recording? 4 hours?

 

With regards to RCE compatibility?? It looks like a programming issue? Great to hear that.

 

thanks once again

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With regards to recording, what should of recording modes does it have ?

LP, SP and HQ

How long is the LP recording? 4 hours?

There are 6 recording modes. According to the manual:

 

(1) HQ - 1 hr

Highest picture quality recording mode, perfect for making copies of DV camcorder footage

 

(2) SP - 2 hrs

Picture quality as good as any pre-recorded DVD disk, perfect for making lasting copies from any source in DVD quality

 

(3) SP+ - 2.5 hrs

Better than S-VHS quality

 

(4) LP - 3 hrs

Picture quality like S-VHS; ideal balance between picture quality and recording time

 

(5) EP - 4 hrs

Picture quality better than VHS; perfect as VCR replacement

 

(6) EP+ - 6 hrs

Picture quality better than VHS; practical for recording many programs while away from home.

 

Of course, the thing to note is that the final recorded quality is only as good as that of the source. If your TV reception is crap, then the recording quality is also crap :), well maybe slightly better than crap as there tend to be less noise in slow and stationary scenes.

 

 

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I am holding out for Philips to launch a model with similar functions as the 890 but with a built-in harddisk as well. This will give me much more flexibility as you can record long hours of programs onto the harddisk and then decide which ones you would want to keep onto the blank DVD-RW.

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I am holding out for Philips to launch a model with similar functions as the 890 but with a built-in harddisk as well. This will give me much more flexibility as you can record long hours of programs onto the harddisk and then decide which ones you would want to keep onto the blank DVD-RW.

 

I know in the US, the setup box can be modified to put in a harddisk.Anyway, why want till Philips come out with such a model. You can do one now through your computer with either a 200GB HD or a DVD +R/RW writer.

 

I have been doing it for quite sometime but very very tedious. I would prefer the DVD890 anytime. Just like a normal video recorder.

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I am holding out for Philips to launch a model with similar functions as the 890 but with a built-in harddisk as well. This will give me much more flexibility as you can record long hours of programs onto the harddisk and then decide which ones you would want to keep onto the blank DVD-RW.

 

I know in the US, the setup box can be modified to put in a harddisk.Anyway, why want till Philips come out with such a model. You can do one now through your computer with either a 200GB HD or a DVD +R/RW writer.

 

I have been doing it for quite sometime but very very tedious. I would prefer the DVD890 anytime. Just like a normal video recorder.

 

hi ckang, I have the same idea as jeffong. The reason is more than just convert to DVD. The purpose for me is to use as a traditional VCR: record a program when I can't catch, so I can watch later. This type of program no need to record to DVD. panasonic and pioneer have all put a harddisk in their latest models, I hope philips can do the same soon.

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If the purpose is to use as a VCR to catch programs that you miss, then all the more you should just get a DVDR like the 890 since a DVD+RW can be re-recorded more than 1000 times. That's what I'm doing with mine at the moment. There is no need to use DVD+R for such purposes.

 

If what you really want is to store the recording onto a hard disk, then an Amoisonic Digital Video Recorder, DVR 3000 would suffice. It is much cheaper than the DVDR 890 and comes with a 40G hard-disk and can store 12 hrs of dvd-quality, or 23 hrs of SVCD quality, or 40 hrs of VCD quality video recording from its built-in time-shifting TV tuner.

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Time shifting off-the-air programs don't really need a DVDR. Most likely, watch once and forget. Who really want to record Matrix from TCS5 onto DVD+R? If its a good movie, just buy the DVD with bonus extras not found on the air-waves. Not many would want to watch "Wheel of fortune" or some sappy TCS8 drama more than twice. ::) ::)

 

However, recording and archiving personal DV-cam footage does justify the purchase of a DVD recorder. Baby's first steps or the smile of your wife on your wedding day is priceless. :'(

 

2 schools of thought here.

 

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There are situations where you have to leave the country for a week. A DVD-RW can only store 2 hours worth of medium quality recording. That's where the DVD-RW Recorder w/ harddisk can come in handy. It allows me to get all the wonderful features that recorders like the 890 provides plus not having to worry about whether the blank disc that I put inside is sufficient to record everything that I want.

 

Moreover, such solutions do not cost much more. The Samsung HS-40 does almost everything that the Philips is capable of but comes with the added bonus of a harddisk for only $1400 RRP. Another example would be the Panny HS2 player.

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There are situations where you have to leave the country for a week. A DVD-RW can only store 2 hours worth of medium quality recording. That's where the DVD-RW Recorder w/ harddisk can come in handy. It allows me to get all the wonderful features that recorders like the 890 provides plus not having to worry about whether the blank disc that I put inside is sufficient to record everything that I want.

exactly. that's what I want also. in fact what philips can do is just to add a harddisk. it is very easy and won't cost a lot. I have a feeling they sooner or later will do it since the competitor is already doing that.

to me, to most important things are:

1) transfer my DV tapes through the iLink cable to a DVD

2) be used as normal VCR to record missed programs

3) and if it is itself a good DVD player then it is a (big) plus

 

 

 

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