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NAS or no?


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Hello, apols if this has already been covered multiple times but I am very new to this streaming business.

 

I have a Cambridge CXN which I use for Tidal and also have a portable hard drive with 200gb of lossless music.

 

I don't really understand this NAS stuff but wondered if I would benefit from one.

 

I listen to music in one room only Naim 82/250 to SHL5+ and wifey listens via Sonos in kitchen/living.

 

Sorry I sound like a technophobe, I probably am :)

 

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26 minutes ago, cookster said:

Hello, apols if this has already been covered multiple times but I am very new to this streaming business.

 

I have a Cambridge CXN which I use for Tidal and also have a portable hard drive with 200gb of lossless music.

 

I don't really understand this NAS stuff but wondered if I would benefit from one.

 

I listen to music in one room only Naim 82/250 to SHL5+ and wifey listens via Sonos in kitchen/living.

 

Sorry I sound like a technophobe, I probably am :)

 

You'd benefit from the fact the hard drives back up one another so you wouldn't have to painstakingly re-rip your entire collection should one fail.

 

From a performance standpoint, I don't think there would be much (if any) sonic advantage.

 

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I have a NAS on my home LAN, it has music, photos, videos etc on it. So, I use Audirvana on a Mac Mini upstairs to play hi-res digital music files on the high end 2ch system, while downstairs I can stream music, pics and videos on the large screen/surround sound system. I could equally use an iTunes server loaded on the NAS to listen to music as well. Or you could use any other usual servers. As it’s on the LAN, it can be accessed from anywhere in the house and by different devices. I can also access it remotely, but I don’t do that practically. So, it works for me.

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As well as offering a method for sharing files on a local network, a NAS will typically allow you to configure the storage as a RAID array offering protection from a disk failure.

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1 hour ago, Rickus said:

As well as offering a method for sharing files on a local network, a NAS will typically allow you to configure the storage as a RAID array offering protection from a disk failure.

Yes, that’s another good point. I have 4 x 6TB drives  configured in RAID10, so it’s a robust storage solution.

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In the process of replacing a drive in my ageing Netgear ReadyNASduo, I bought 2 replacement 4Tb WD red drives just to find out it cannot read above 2Tb.

I had a 2 Tb red in my PC, so fitted one of the 4Tb drives to the PC and copied all data from the 2Tb across. C drive is a 1 Tb M.2.

Formatted the 2Tb then fitted that in the NAS to replace the failing drive there.

Then reassigned the 4Tb with the same letter the 2Tb had.

All good so far.

 

A NAS is pretty essential if you have multiple devices accessing the same library.

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If 200GB is all you need, stick with the external drive and make a copy on your PC in case it fails.

That will do your needs.

If you want to spend money, just buy another external drive and copy them to each other as a back up.

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I have a QNAP TS-x53Be. I use a NAS so I don't need to leave my PC on all the time and any content it is serving is available 24/7 to any user in the house. I run Roon, Plex and some other software on it. It's also easy to maintain as it runs headless connected to the network (no need for keyboard, mouse or screen to be connected ever).

 

I haven't bothered with RAID. While it protects from a drive failure, it offers no redundancy in the event the whole unit or all the drives are fried or fail for some other reason. You could lose all your data and a redundant RAID array won't help you one iota.

 

As RAID provides no benefits to me I have the NAS setup as JBOD, that way I can easily move the drives to a new NAS or my PC if required - by doing so there's no need to rebuild arrays and you are also not locked to the same NAS brand or type should you change in the future. For example I recently upgraded from a 2-bay to a 4-bay model, it was as simple as swapping the drives and doing a few other little things to get them up and running.

 

With regards to redundancy all of my critical data stored on the NAS (mainly my digital photos) is also backed up in full resolution in the cloud, on my PC and on an external drive I keep in a desk drawer. Any other data on the NAS if lost can be replaced, although my lossless music library (which has taken years to curate) is also backed up on my PC as well as the external drive.

Edited by Bikkitz
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