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RCD's


nzlowie

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3 hours ago, nzlowie said:

 

Hi guys, just getting the sparky in to run a dedicated circuit for my new listening room.... He says all new circuits must have an RCD, do these add any noise or any other issues?

 

Cheers

 

 

Not that I notice.

 

Can you get him to run several dedicated circuits?  (1 for analogue source, 1 for digital source ... and 1 for power amp(s) is ideal, IMO.)  And get him to use 32a wiring in the wall, with 20a MCBs.

 

Andy

 

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5 hours ago, nzlowie said:

 

Hi guys, just getting the sparky in to run a dedicated circuit for my new listening room.... He says all new circuits must have an RCD, do these add any noise or any other issues?

 

Cheers

 

 

They can makes less noise, particularly the noise of someone getting zapped. They’re not expensive, if In the board I’d have them bring it up to code.

 

Thicker wiring does a lot more when you’ve better earthing, so now would be the time to review as much.

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On 19/02/2019 at 2:27 PM, nzlowie said:

 

Hi guys, just getting the sparky in to run a dedicated circuit for my new listening room.... He says all new circuits must have an RCD, do these add any noise or any other issues?

No.

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1 hour ago, Sir Sanders Zingmore said:

Is there any issue so bad that it’s worth not having them?

 

No. You'll only have problems if there's some weird resistance or conductance on your live/neutral, and that's a far worse problem that they're designed to trip over. 

 

It is also a legal requirement for works to current code. Whilst you may sub some circuits under a RCD/RCBO, at some point you everything is protected by something doing current sensing that's wondering if something's leaking to earth when it shouldn't - so you don't really have a choice in the matter either.

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On 19/02/2019 at 7:11 PM, nzlowie said:

Not enough room on the switch board for too many more circuits. You're saying 32a circuit?

 

Depends what you mean by a 'circuit'!  :)  I'm saying have a 20a MCB in the switchboard ... but use 32a wiring in the wall (to reduce the voltage drop along the wire).  That's called a '20a circuit'.

 

(You can use a thicker wire than what the MCB is rated for ... but you can't use a higher-rated MCB than what the wire can handle.)

 

Andy

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