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$5000 to spend on a turntable


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Ok at present I do not actually have $5,000 to spend on a turntable, but I do have a question if you don't mind.

 

My question for those who know way more than I do about turntables and what is where on the TT pecking order and are prepared to share their thoughts and knowledge, whether for new or secondhand units, is the following.

 

What would be your top single turntable recommendation at each of the following price points and why?

 

1. $2,000

 

2. $3,000

 

3. $4000

 

4. $5000

 

This is simply just for the turntable (and tone arm) with no cartridge and no phono stage. 

 

cheers Terry

Edited by TerryO
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One question though, what would you spend on a cartridge and phono post getting a $5000 turntable because it kind of gets down to that when it comes to whether you are hearing a good system or a kick ass one.

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4 hours ago, Hensa said:

So Terry, you mean for turntable and tonearm, I presume?

 

 

Hi Greg, 

 

yes I meant with a tone arm fitted. 

 

Cheers Terry

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4 hours ago, TerryO said:

Ok at present I do not actually have $5,000 to spend on a turntable, but I do have a question if you don't mind.

 

My question for those who know way more than I do about turntables and what is where on the TT pecking order and are prepared to share their thoughts and knowledge, whether for new or secondhand units, is the following.

 

What would be your top single turntable recommendation at each of the following price points and why?

 

1. $2,000 - Rega

 

2. $3,000 - Kuzma Stabi/Stogi S (second hand)

 

3. $4000 - Kuzma Stabi/Stogi S (new)

 

4. $5000 - Dr Feickert Woodpecker 2

 

This is simply just for the turntable with no cartridge and no phono stage. 

 

cheers Terry

 

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I don't know anything about TT's but since I've gotten one recently, my rule of thumb is I will only spend upto what I spent on the TT on the cart and phono. Obviously mine isn't fancy enough to have it's own arm, but for now, that's the rule I'm following.

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4 hours ago, Qwertyqaz said:

One question though, what would you spend on a cartridge and phono post getting a $5000 turntable because it kind of gets down to that when it comes to whether you are hearing a good system or a kick ass one.

I appreciate that the cartridge will make a massive difference Qwertyqaz, but it we could start at the best Turntables per price point then in the future the cart conversation could be had. If I had asked the question including cart it would be to many variables.

 

cheers Terry

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1. $2,000

 

Rega variant with Grovetracer upgrades and TT PSU.

 

2. $3,000

 

Linn Sondek LP12 with Ittok and Hercules Mose PSU.

 

3. $4000

 

Garrard 401 with Golden Age Audio Univector 12 inch arm.

 

4. $5000

 

Michell Gyrodec SE with Michell Tecnoarm.

Edited by Telecine
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1 hour ago, TerryO said:

I appreciate that the cartridge will make a massive difference Qwertyqaz, but it we could start at the best Turntables per price point then in the future the cart conversation could be had. If I had asked the question including cart it would be to many variables.

 

cheers Terry

The downside is you can easily be disappointed if the cartridge is not right. Then you lose the whole analog plot.

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1. Rega P6 or 2nd hand VPI Traveller 

 

2. VPI Scout - later model or Rega RP8 2nd hand

 

3. VPI Prime Scout

 

4. VPI Classic 1 - 2nd hand if you can find one.  

 

Benz Micro Ace S low output MC cartridge for all of them. 

 

See Krispy Audio for VPI

Edited by muzzagruzz
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I would be inclined to buy a stock Lenco GL75, upgraded bearing and Idler wheel, and PTP top plate.

Then I would commision someone to build me a slate plinth to put it in.

 

That leaves about 3k to spend on a tonearm. :)

Might even have funds left over for a speed controller.

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@soundfan LOVE YOU IDEA BUT SOME questions.....

buying a good Lenco75 with upgraded bits requires a degree of expertise and knowhow, no ?

And who would you commission for the plinth?

And to service or get the Lenco working ok?

I for one would love to do exactly as you say but I have no idea how to go about this and also the fear of maintaining the rig without some assistance from a knowledgable local bears upon such a purchase.

Is there a Sydney group of vintage tt lovers?

 

 

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25 minutes ago, Toyboyo said:

@soundfan LOVE YOU IDEA BUT SOME questions.....

buying a good Lenco75 with upgraded bits requires a degree of expertise and knowhow, no ?

And who would you commission for the plinth?

And to service or get the Lenco working ok?

I for one would love to do exactly as you say but I have no idea how to go about this and also the fear of maintaining the rig without some assistance from a knowledgable local bears upon such a purchase.

Is there a Sydney group of vintage tt lovers?

 

 

I have a heavily modded Lenco, with all the upgrades I spoke of, but no slate plinth.

I love the Zebraco CNC milled plinth I have, but if I was to do it again would go slate.

 

As for Lencos and servicing, the motor they use is a warhorse and they go and go and go.

 

And yes, I purchased my Lenco with the PTP plate and plinth it was in, so I had a head start with mods.

 

 I upgraded bearing, Idler Wheel and purchased a speed controller, and also now use 2 platters with extended spindle.

 

May I suggest you go to Lenco Heaven website, a superb reference site for Lenco lovers.

 

http://www.lencoheaven.net/

 

 

 

 

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stretches the budget a bit, but I think it would be a while before you wanted to upgrade.. 

 

sorry just re-read the OP and realized its a hypothetical question

Edited by charlie_bird
mistake
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The link below rating turntables makes for some very interesting reading, especially the whole section on VPI turntables.

 

How accurate are these ratings? I for one don't know being a newbie, however maybe others on here with much more experience would like to share their thoughts.

 

http://www.high-endaudio.com/RC-Tables.html

 

cheers Terry

Edited by TerryO
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Problem with restored stuff is that something can go wrong down the track and as a you said that you're a TT newbie, best not to fiddle with it unless you know or know of someone local who can assist at the drop of a pin..

For a start up system, you cant go wrong with a low - midrange rega, and having upgrade options that are simple to play around with - its a safe bet.  And if you stuff something up, its easy/cheap to replace.  Once you get confident, and with more $$, start playing around with a better phonostage, tonearm or cart. 

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Problem with restored stuff is that something can go wrong down the track and as a you said that you're a TT newbie, best not to fiddle with it unless you know or know of someone local who can assist at the drop of a pin..
For a start up system, you cant go wrong with a low - midrange rega, and having upgrade options that are simple to play around with - its a safe bet.  And if you stuff something up, its easy/cheap to replace.  Once you get confident, and with more $$, start playing around with a better phonostage, tonearm or cart. 
There is very little to go wrong with a lot of the old idler drives. Very simply built. Parts still available if you choose the right model. Don't be afraid of the old beauties.
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9 minutes ago, Upfront said:
7 hours ago, katattack74 said:
Problem with restored stuff is that something can go wrong down the track and as a you said that you're a TT newbie, best not to fiddle with it unless you know or know of someone local who can assist at the drop of a pin..
For a start up system, you cant go wrong with a low - midrange rega, and having upgrade options that are simple to play around with - its a safe bet.  And if you stuff something up, its easy/cheap to replace.  Once you get confident, and with more $$, start playing around with a better phonostage, tonearm or cart. 

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There is very little to go wrong with a lot of the old idler drives. Very simply built. Parts still available if you choose the right model. Don't be afraid of the old beauties.

Totally agreed.

Idler drives are extremely robust. Once restored they will certainly outlast me.

EMT and Commonwealth were built for broadcast use. They are well engineered far and more robust than TT for the consumer market.

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