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Foxtel Installation Into Single Brick Wall?


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Hi

Hoping for a bit of info and advice from the Foxtel Installers out there.

I want to set our tv up where there is only a single brick wall with the method being "chasing up the wall" and putting pvc pipe/conjoint (?spelling) into the created groove and running the required cables and power down them from the roof.

My question is how many chases will i need to make to run power, foxtel, digital tv antenna, phone line for foxtel, and anything else that is needed plus my rear speaker wires (to rear ceiling speakers) and how big diameter would each pipe/conjoint need to be to fit the cables in?

Is foxtel just 2 coax cables plus phone line and how big diameter are they?

And is there a limitation on what i can run in the same pipe together?

And is there a minimum distance i need between the chases?

Will the power/electrical cable interfer with the foxtel/tv antenna/phone line if put in the same pipe/conjoint?

Thanks in advance

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Hi

Hoping for a bit of info and advice from the Foxtel Installers out there.

I want to set our tv up where there is only a single brick wall with the method being "chasing up the wall" and putting pvc pipe/conjoint (?spelling) into the created groove and running the required cables and power down them from the roof.

My question is how many chases will i need to make to run power, foxtel, digital tv antenna, phone line for foxtel, and anything else that is needed plus my rear speaker wires (to rear ceiling speakers) and how big diameter would each pipe/conjoint need to be to fit the cables in?

Is foxtel just 2 coax cables plus phone line and how big diameter are they?

And is there a limitation on what i can run in the same pipe together?

And is there a minimum distance i need between the chases?

Will the power/electrical cable interfer with the foxtel/tv antenna/phone line if put in the same pipe/conjoint?

Thanks in advance

You will need at least 2 conduits min 25mm. You must keep the coaxial cable & phone lines seperate from the power cables It is a requirement of the Australian Standard (AS3000) You may also require a conduit for HDMI,Toslink optical & Cat 5 from set top box/av equipment to the TV if it is wall mounted and seperated from the equipment

Foxtel IQ via satellite requires 2 RG6 and a phone cable (Cat3/5/6) per set top box. All conduits can run side by side in a wall chase as the conduit provides segregation between the 240V cables and the other cables.

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Thanks for your reply.

Ok so power will need to be on its own and then whatever is able to fit in the conduit with regards to the 2 foxtel cables, 1 tv cable, 1 telephone line and 2 rear speaker cables, plus i now need to run my subwoofer cable from AVR up wall. All these can share the same conduit as long as they fit or in 2 conduits?

I say i will need 3 conduits. One for power only and the other 2 for the rest to fit in. Would you try to put any of them specifically together or apart?

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Thanks for your reply.

Ok so power will need to be on its own and then whatever is able to fit in the conduit with regards to the 2 foxtel cables, 1 tv cable, 1 telephone line and 2 rear speaker cables, plus i now need to run my subwoofer cable from AVR up wall. All these can share the same conduit as long as they fit or in 2 conduits?

I say i will need 3 conduits. One for power only and the other 2 for the rest to fit in. Would you try to put any of them specifically together or apart?

Yes to the power being alone and all others can run in the same conduit/s. If you are running three conduits keep the power to one of the outside conduits. If you are having wall plates at the bottom of the wall you will have to keep enough space between the conduits to be able to mount the wall plates side by side. eg Power, AV & AV

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The phone cable must be kept separated from both power and coax cables.

It's not mandatory when all services are in separate conduits, but it's best to keep coax and phone cables as far away from power cables as possible to reduce possible interference issues. eg: impulse noise interference.

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The phone cable must be kept separated from both power and coax cables.

It's not mandatory when all services are in separate conduits, but it's best to keep coax and phone cables as far away from power cables as possible to reduce possible interference issues. eg: impulse noise interference.

Why run the phone line seperate from the coaxial. No where in the AS3000 does it say to do that. Also would that not mean for each Foxtel/telstra lead in cable to each premises would need to be in a seperate conduits as they are 2pr/10pr Cat3/5 for telephones and a RG6 for pay TV. The main reason for segregation in seperate conduits is so the 240Volts can never touch the ELV system cabling telephone data etc. It is a safety issue. Although as you mention it is good practice to keep them as far apart as the installation allows to protect from noise etc

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The phone cable must be kept separated from both power and coax cables.

WTH??? The only requirement is for low voltage power to be at least 50mm away from other cabling and the power must be in orange conduit whereas the others can be in white conduit.

There is NO requirement and nor should there be for phone and coax to be separated. You do understand that coax is unbalanced with the outside shield grounded? That means there is ZERO EM emission from the coax (which is used for passive reception anyway with microvolt signals).

It's not mandatory when all services are in separate conduits, but it's best to keep coax and phone cables as far away from power cables as possible to reduce possible interference issues. eg: impulse noise interference.

Coax isn't an issue since it's unbalanced and shielded, but unshielded twisted pair cat 5/6 phone/data cabling can be affected by nearby power cabling easily even if 50mm separation is met. If it's critical then use shielded twisted pair Cat5/6 for phone or data. The big issue is the speaker cabling. That should be given as much spacing as possible from the power cabling and ideally be separated from any unshielded twisted pair data cabling as well.

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The segratgation is 50mm or a pysical seperatation, i.e. tray, conduit, duct. Also remember that this is for the running of the cabling, not the terminating. If you have two faceplates (1 x power and 1 x data) in a normal giprock cavity wall, then you need 150mm seperation between the faceplates (this more than the 50mm).

There are many more rules, which is why it is illegal to run any cabling that connects to a carrier network (wired or wireless) without a licence (patch leads used for their intended use are not required to be run by a licenced cabler).

These are also safety issues and not performance issues, the two are very different things.

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The segratgation is 50mm or a pysical seperatation, i.e. tray, conduit, duct. Also remember that this is for the running of the cabling, not the terminating. If you have two faceplates (1 x power and 1 x data) in a normal giprock cavity wall, then you need 150mm seperation between the faceplates (this more than the 50mm).

First up, we are discussing a situation of chasing down a masonry wall which provides a sufficient insulation between the terminations as well (assuming they points are chased to different cavity openings), and secondly the separation requirement of 150mm specified in TS 009 only applies for single insulated LV power and data cabling. If you use the plastic covers that clip onto the back of RJ45 socket mechanisms then that provides a compliant insulating barrier.

That's why you can have installations like this but only when the insulation clips are used:

http://www.clipsal.com/trade/__data/page/81/A77.pdf

As for the coax and speaker cabling that can be terminated as close as you like since they aren't connected to a carrier network and you can cable them yourself.

There are many more rules, which is why it is illegal to run any cabling that connects to a carrier network (wired or wireless) without a licence (patch leads used for their intended use are not required to be run by a licenced cabler).

That's what I like about this forum compared to the moronic Nazi moderators over at whirlpool etc, you don't have to pander to the outright nanny state bullshit of dictating regulation licensing. At the end of the day if anyone studies and understands AS3000 and TS009 etc then they should be able to do it themselves as long as the final result is a standards compliant installation.

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