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Finally Got Perfect Reception, But Have An Interesting Question Still....


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Hi guys and gals,

Finally figured out on the weekend where my antenna wiring went wrong, so decided to log on and hopefully this message gets stickied or FAQ'd for everyone else.

I isolated each cable and got out a Multimeter to do a 'Connectivity test' to be sure the shielding of each cable wasn't in contact with the Central conductor and as such, found a few which needed to be rectified.

Also interestingly enough, the Coax connectors I was using meant I had to improvise on how I spliced the wiring so that the shield would actually make contact with the Coax casing, otherwise any EMI would not be grounded at the TV end.

Now for the other part, I bought a DOSS CLP32 for $44 here (or $80 at Jaycar if you feel rich lol) > http://www.radioparts.com.au/ProdView.aspx...NA+LOG+PERIODIC

And when doing a 'Connectivity test' at the connector on this antenna, I noticed that both the outer and inner part of this terminal is connected to the Antenna ears..... :huh:

So automatically, I realised all that hard work on the Coax cables isolating the ground and conductor cables would be useless, if at the Antenna end they where then bridged... So I purposely unbridged it at the cable connector, by not connecting the shield to the outer, and wollah, almost perfect Analog reception and exceptionally good Digital reception, especially considering the signal is also split two way and that I have a palm tree blocking line of sight to the transmitter, therefore less than ideal angle.

So the question at the end of all of this is, has anyone else encountered this issue with other antennas? Is this normal for both inner and outer to be connected to the antenna ears? And therefore the installer must always isolate the 'bridging' that would occur if the Coax connector was spliced on right?

Thanks for your time!

^_^

(Adelaide Metro Area, for future reference)

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glad you got the reception you wanted, but what a hassle! wouldn't it have been easier to call a specialist? then you'd have a chance that the results will last.

as to the open or short question, continuity tests are useful as you did it but not necessarily relevant when you are dealing with the antenna.

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So the question at the end of all of this is, has anyone else encountered this issue with other antennas? Is this normal for both inner and outer to be connected to the antenna ears? And therefore the installer must always isolate the 'bridging' that would occur if the Coax connector was spliced on right?

Thanks for your time!

^_^

(Adelaide Metro Area, for future reference)

abently

What you have discovered is quite correct for UHF Log Periodic antennas .

Also Antennas that have a 4:1 ferrite balan will also have close to zero OHMs resistance across the coaxial terminals.

Antennas that have a PCB balan construction generally have open curcuit ( infinitely high resistance)

I guess as an installer ,my fault finding techniques are different from yours.

I generally don't use a multimeter but rather a field strength meter to determine what sections of the system are faulty.

Depending on the complexity of the system,I have different logical test points to pin point the problem

The method you are using is very practical in the absence of a field strength meter how ever as you have discovered it is very laborious to have to disconnect every section to test .

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Thanks for the replies.

If 2 hours is too long to fault find and fix, then you guys must be pretty lazy or busy... ^_^

No offense here but in 2 hours I can generally do a complete installation .

I charge $60 per hour which is too cheap ( my mechanic is charging me $75 bucks per hour to keep my van on the road) .

So when you are paying me to fault find 2 hours is too long to spend .

I need to find the problem in less than half an hour to decide what is the best course or action.

It is bad economics for an installer to spend longer to find out whats wrong than it takes to do a complete new install.

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No offense here but in 2 hours I can generally do a complete installation .

I charge $60 per hour which is too cheap ( my mechanic is charging me $75 bucks per hour to keep my van on the road) .

So when you are paying me to fault find 2 hours is too long to spend .

I need to find the problem in less than half an hour to decide what is the best course or action.

It is bad economics for an installer to spend longer to find out whats wrong than it takes to do a complete new install.

I concur..

But I'm sure no Saturday arvo Dad does an oil change in 15 mins either, so your point remains invalid. :)

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Agreed Bello-no more than 1/2 hour fault finding then 1/2 hour fix. $60 an hour is too cheap mate-change it to a rate per job-ie extra point $80, amp $120, split-GCD $0 total: $200-fair price.

Problem with hourly rate is the easy jobs pay nothing and the pain in the arse pays more but shits you, remember always charge extra for repairs to poorly attempted back yard jobs-lol...

better off having set rates and taking the good with the bad.

$20 on a cable buzzer would've sorted your connection issue and isolated the fault a lot quicker than 2hrs.

Anyone doing a backyard job is expected to take a lot longer.

Only connecting the centre conductor????Special technique to solve your problem...have a look at the balun on your antenna-should have a female f-conn with a pair of wires attaching to your antenna via wingnuts or bolts...a male f-conn attaches to this goes back to your tv via amp/split......the centre conductor and the outer are both needed to keep the circuit working-if you remove the outer conductor there will be problems again-its only a matter of time.

Sorry, body language doesn't come across well on the internet...

I'm sure most of those 2 hours was spent going up and down the ladder onto the roof, chasing tools in the garage and also trying to keep my fingers alive in the 6 or so degrees it was that morning in Adelaide. :D

I should take offence to that 'poorly attempted' remark... if you have ever tried to route wiring down a wall towards the very bottom, and yet keep it concealed, you would know it takes some skill, with no appropriate tools, to firstly find where the horizontal timber frames are located (this one was actually at 45 degrees....), and then only section of a small 1.5cm width, 10 cm long hole (which was then flushed) to route the cabling around the timber and back on downwards towards the new outlet. Any real backyarder would have made a mess of such a task.... -_-

I agree on setting a fixed price, most customers want to know what it will cost all up, not what hourly rate is charged. When you do quote a fixed price, state that is for a standard installation, whereby standard installation may mean big tiled roof with no ducting and brick/vernier frame etc etc just to cover yourself for those pain in the arse jobs.

:)

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