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3d Bd Playback On Pc


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linky

This June, NVIDIA will be releasing new drivers that will enable 3D Blu-ray playback on supported NVIDIA graphics cards. Besides the GPU and 3D Vision kit, you'll need a compatible display that supports 3D Vision; basically a 120Hz LCD monitor (no 3D TVs are currently supported at the moment).

That's all one needs?

I wonder can our TVs here do 120... :( Prob not...

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I just can't get excited about 3D movies. Maybe its a personal failing but after watching Avatar on Blu-ray in 2D I really don't think I'd bother with the current 3D technology.

Just for fun I guess :P...

Like u I prefer Avatar in 2D... But OTOH, watching a 55 Samsung demo, the 3D is actually quite good (I think with small screens 3D actually work better, at least it doesn't have that stacked 2D effect I get when watching Avatar 3D @ the movies)...

Now if one has a HTPC, and a display capable of doing 120hz.. This might be a good option for 'em...

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I'm not convinced that TVs with 120Hz inputs are required for 3D movies: worst case is that 1080p60 could support 2 separate eyes at 30fps and the TV displays this internally at 120fps. Normal situation would be 1080p48. Very unlikely a movie would be 1080p60 to require 1080p120 for 3D.

I guess it depends where you want to create the 120fps.

I can see video games could utilise 1080p120, but then they are more suited to 3D as the consumer is also a participant in the action (with movies the consumer is a passive observer).

I don't know whether Australian TVs do 120Hz internally or only 60Hz: since they do 100Hz, I'm sure the panels are capable of 120Hz, but whether the driving electronics are configured for that is questionable. It's kind of curious that the specifications usually mention 100Hz and 24fps but generally nothing else.

After my experience with an Aussie Panasonic LCD that had less features than its USA brethren, but a similar model number, it wouldn't surprise me if we lost 120Hz capability in lieu of PAL support.

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I'm not convinced that TVs with 120Hz inputs are required for 3D movies: worst case is that 1080p60 could support 2 separate eyes at 30fps and the TV displays this internally at 120fps. Normal situation would be 1080p48. Very unlikely a movie would be 1080p60 to require 1080p120 for 3D.

This 120hz is prob a PC thing. Just curious how the nvidia thing works. Is it sending a singal at 120hz? Thatd prob chew up a lot of HDMI cables...

FWIW I'm not convinced one actually needs a 3D TV to watch 3D.. :D Hence this post...

I don't know whether Australian TVs do 120Hz internally or only 60Hz: since they do 100Hz, I'm sure the panels are capable of 120Hz, but whether the driving electronics are configured for that is questionable. It's kind of curious that the specifications usually mention 100Hz and 24fps but generally nothing else.

After my experience with an Aussie Panasonic LCD that had less features than its USA brethren, but a similar model number, it wouldn't surprise me if we lost 120Hz capability in lieu of PAL support.

I only got a DFP. And I couldn't get detailed specs from the support unfortunately... Oh well.

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TVs of recent vintage could be expected to accept 50p or 60p via HDMI.

If the PC were able to send an infra red signal to shutter glasses at the very slow rate of 50p for Australian DTV transmissions and the glasses could accept such a slow rate, and if the time delay of the TVs video processing could be adjusted for, half frame rate* 3D should be possible.

However I imagine it would be flicker city, a bit like like watching a CRT monitor set to 50Hz :blink:

Another option to avoid use of infrared synhcronising would be for the shutter glasses to run at a crystal locked 50Hz, with a manual phase adjustment control for the viewer to tweak while watching the playback of state of origin recording that has been processed into alternating 25Hz left and right full frames for display on your 50fps TV ...

Come to think of it, such glasses could be manufactured to auto synch to the frame rate, using a small camera. You'd need to view in dim lighting, facing the TV screen. Now where is that patent application form? ...

_______________

* 50 frames a second, 25 frames for viewing by the left eye, and 25 for viewing by the right eye. The flicker would be horrendous. Perhaps use only partial dimming for each eye to reduce flicker, and sacrifice stereo clarity. I suspect human eyes only need low contrast 3D to perceive the stereo effect.

Edited by MLXXX
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TVs of recent vintage could be expected to accept 50p or 60p via HDMI.

If the PC were able to send an infra red signal to shutter glasses at the very slow rate of 50p for Australian DTV transmissions and the glasses could accept such a slow rate, and if the time delay of the TVs video processing could be adjusted for, half frame rate* 3D should be possible.

However I imagine it would be flicker city, a bit like like watching a CRT monitor set to 50Hz :blink:

Another option to avoid use of infrared synhcronising would be for the shutter glasses to run at a crystal locked 50Hz, with a manual phase adjustment control for the viewer to tweak while watching the playback of state of origin recording that has been processed into alternating 25Hz left and right full frames for display on your 50fps TV ...

So it's possible?? But the Nvidia specs specifically said the panel needs to be able to do 120hz.. (Yet to test mine).

Come to think of it, such glasses could be manufactured to auto synch to the frame rate, using a small camera. You'd need to view in dim lighting, facing the TV screen. Now where is that patent application form? ...

Do it do it.. :P

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