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Trf7160 Questions


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I'm thinking of getting a TRF7160. Will the remote for the TRF7160 interfere with my TF5010PVRtH?

The TRF7160 can play vob files. Does that mean that if I copied a DVD to a thumb drive, will the TRF7160 play the menu of the DVD? I author DVDs and this would be great if it does. Instead of having to burn the DVD to a DVD-RW all the time to check things.

Any idea when the quad recordings is going to happen? Or is this just a marketing ploy to get consumers to buy Topfield units.

The manual says that it plays DivX formats 3.x, 4.x, 5.x and 6.x. Does it play version 7.x?

Has anyone had any problems with the unit so far?

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Any idea when the quad recordings is going to happen?

Very soon, it's already working in betas that are only available to beta testers.

Firmware is in the final stages of testing and provided no adverse side affects happen with the fixes there will probably be a release within the next week ot two for the 2460,2400,7100HD+ & 7160.

Edited by Vortical
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Very soon, it's already working in betas that are only available to beta testers.

Firmware is in the final stages of testing and provided no adverse side affects happen with the fixes there will probably be a release within the next week ot two for the 2460,2400,7100HD+ & 7160.

Thanks for the reply

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  • 3 weeks later...

....just a caveat for those who wanna buy this unit, use Optus as their ISP, and are interested in accessing the PVR externally by PC. The unit will only access HTTP through port 80 and Optus block that port. Can still access the FTP through port 21, but this is only for file transfer; you can't schedule a recording through FTP.

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....just a caveat for those who wanna buy this unit, use Optus as their ISP, and are interested in accessing the PVR externally by PC. The unit will only access HTTP through port 80 and Optus block that port. Can still access the FTP through port 21, but this is only for file transfer; you can't schedule a recording through FTP.
You would be absolutely nuts to expose your PVR to the internet on those ports anyway. I expose my home boxes to the internet only on mapped ports (not immune completely to hacking, but as I use SSH and port tunnelling too for extra security, it is pretty secure). Most routers let you setup ports ports to map to servers, you can setup say port 1235 external to map to port 80 on your Toppy, and then type http://home_public_ip_address:1235/ into your browser to access for example.
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You would be absolutely nuts to expose your PVR to the internet on those ports anyway. I expose my home boxes to the internet only on mapped ports (not immune completely to hacking, but as I use SSH and port tunnelling too for extra security, it is pretty secure). Most routers let you setup ports ports to map to servers, you can setup say port 1235 external to map to port 80 on your Toppy, and then type http://home_public_ip_address:1235/ into your browser to access for example.

OK thanks, will have a go at that.

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Another tip, if you access from the office, is some offices have proxies and the like that refuse to allow anything thru other than 80 or 443, is to map it to port 443 instead. So in your router you would setup "trigger from port 443 TCP, send to Toppy_IP_Address port 80 TCP" in whatever GUI/options your router has (it is obviously different in each router).

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OK, thanks again Tony will give that a try tonight.
Presumably you set up this port mapping already, but for port 80, right? As you can't access anything inside your network from the internet unless you map ports to services in a NAT router (typical router used for home networks sharing one public IP address). This is the way NAT works-

it listens for connection attempts from inside your network, and sends them out to the internet, and listen for responses and knows which machine to send them to of course (as it is managing your communications from machine to internet). But it can't do the same in reverse, as, when you are on the internet, you can't say "connect to my 192.168.0.blah machine" as this wouldn't work (the internet doesn't know where to send that). So when you make a connection from the internet (e.g. to port 80 for example, typical web port), this is really just getting as far as your router, and your router needs to be told what to do with this information, routers will simply dump all initiating connection attempts when they originate from the internet. The only way for your router to know what machine you want to talk to, when you are on the internet, is to map ports to "servers" (where your Topfield is your "server" in this case).

Regards

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Presumably you set up this port mapping already, but for port 80, right? As you can't access anything inside your network from the internet unless you map ports to services in a NAT router (typical router used for home networks sharing one public IP address). This is the way NAT works-

it listens for connection attempts from inside your network, and sends them out to the internet, and listen for responses and knows which machine to send them to of course (as it is managing your communications from machine to internet). But it can't do the same in reverse, as, when you are on the internet, you can't say "connect to my 192.168.0.blah machine" as this wouldn't work (the internet doesn't know where to send that). So when you make a connection from the internet (e.g. to port 80 for example, typical web port), this is really just getting as far as your router, and your router needs to be told what to do with this information, routers will simply dump all initiating connection attempts when they originate from the internet. The only way for your router to know what machine you want to talk to, when you are on the internet, is to map ports to "servers" (where your Topfield is your "server" in this case).

Regards

Let me know if I've got this right. I've set up an account through dynsdns.org with the external IP address of my router, 122.106.xx.xxx and I call this account "my.homedns.org". In my router, if I port forward to 80 using the internal IP address of the Toppy 198.162.x.x then I should be able to access the pvr from work by http://my.homedns.org/. But, since Optus block port 80, you say I have to access my router externally through a different port, say 435, then remap this using the router to the internal port 80. This isn't port triggering but NAT? My router is a Netgear WNS2000v2, not sure if it supports this kind of setup.

Thanks.

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Different routers call it different things. I said "trigger" but really it is a NAT forwarding action. But yep, you have it now. So you would access from work at http://my.homedns.org:435/ instead. But this is still a tad risky keeping it open to the public... unless the Toppy refuses to do anything without a secure password entry.

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Different routers call it different things. I said "trigger" but really it is a NAT forwarding action. But yep, you have it now. So you would access from work at http://my.homedns.org:435/ instead. But this is still a tad risky keeping it open to the public... unless the Toppy refuses to do anything without a secure password entry.

Has both login and password.

Thanks again.

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Yep as I suspected can't do port translation on my router, so back to drawing board.
I just looked at my Asus router, it is called "virtual server" in that router (and even my old netcomm one had a similar option).
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Oh, just looking at your PDF for that and it will only map to the same port (i.e. you tell it what port to listen for and what machine to send it to).... perhaps you could rig up some kind of port forwarding in your home network, and do it that way?

I use SSH tunnelling to achieve this actually. You setup a SSH server on your network, to listen on a particular port, then use the putty client on your work PC to log into your SSH server. You can tell most SSH servers to listen on any port, so you can map any port thru on your router (I use 443, but you could use something else, lets say portZZ). Then you simply get putty to SSH into your home server on blah.dyndns.org:portZZ, and setup the putty client to tunnel the following way in the tunnelling settings (in pseudo english here, it is really just 4 fields to setup in the tunnelling section): "map anything heading for portXX to the remote host 192.168.0.blah:portYY", and the tunnelling takes care of it. To then access your Toppy from your work PC, you would put "http://localhost:portXX/" into the web browser, and SSH will tunnel this to your remote host (Toppy 192.168.0.blah port YY).

(SSH is like telnet, but secure). All you need to do on the SSH server in your home network is enable port forwarding (or perhaps they might call it port tunnelling).

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I actually have a little "SLUG" (NSLU2) sitting in my home network that acts as a gateway to my Topfield 5000, and as my network NAS. I run SSH on that. But I did mod the firmware in my WL600G router once to support SSH also, but when I upgraded to the latest release from Asus not that long ago, didn't bother going the mod route (didn't have the time to setup dev env on new machine I got either).

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Could I do the following daisy chain setup using a wired router...

Cable Modem Out to wireless Router A WAN Port, wireless Router A LAN port out to wired RouterB WAN port, and wired RouterB LAN port into Toppy

The wired router would support port translation (was looking at getting a ASUS RX-3041 router for <$20)

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