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Problem With Pvr Ready Stb Available From Jaycar


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Not too long ago, I purchased a Digital View stb (model xc-4912) and use it in conjunction with a Seagate 500gb HDD that was already formatted as NTFS by default. Fairly recently, Ive noticed a surprising thing that's occurred when trying to record with this stb. Instead of recording, a message comes up that says that i have too many recorded files and that I need to clean the disk. Though Ive supposedly got about 70% free space left on the HDD! The only way that I can get around this problem is by deleting ad breaks and test recordings that I hadn't deleted earlier.

Though what happens when I only have material left that I want to keep and this message comes up? And of course I'm nowhere near filling up even half of the hard drive's capacity yet. I'd say that Ive used up about a quarter so far and I get the dreaded message from time to time. I don't want to fork out money for another HD....especially so soon.

Update: I did delete some ad breaks which in total would not accumulate too much time – perhaps 8 – 10 minutes max. That did temporarily solve the problem and I was able to go ahead and record a movie. Obviously, a movie (in this case 1 and a half hours) is a considerably longer length of time than 10 minutes....and yet it allowed me to record the whole movie without any problems. Even though the stb did previously have a problem with a bunch of files that together, accumulated a much shorter time duration. However, today I tried recording and again got the message 'Too many recorded files – clean the disk.'

I want to record two movies (one tonight and one tomorrow), and probably more over the next few months on this Seagate HDD. And I also like recording songs off Rage too but I don't know how much longer I can do this with the current problem. As mentioned before, Ive got about 70% free space left on the hard drive and yet the stb thinks that I have too many recorded files. I'm running out of files that require deletion. Any suggestions?

Edited by tribal-warrior
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... Instead of recording, a message comes up that says that i have too many recorded files and that I need to clean the disk. Though Ive supposedly got about 70% free space left on the HDD! The only way that I can get around this problem is by deleting ad breaks and test recordings that I hadn't deleted earlier.

...

It's a guess, but sounds like it may have a limit on how many recordings it can show at once in the GUI. How many recordings do you have? Can you work around the problem by creating folders and moving some of the recordings into folders so that there are fewer recordings to display at once? This may be useful anyway if you have a lot of recordings :)

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I'm not sure that this is relevant but it may be worth investigating.

I haven't had such a problem since the early 80's using DOS 1. The problem was simply a limit on the number of files a directory could hold - nothing to do with available disc space (Dos 1 was designed for use with Floppy discs not HDD).

Is it possible that you have a large number of small files (you do mention rock clips) ?

If so, I would suggest archiving such material to make use of your HDD. To record your movie just delete ONE clip :)

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I have a vague memory of there being a limit of 512 or 2048 separate files only in the root folder but an overall limit of several billion as long as they were not in the root on an NTFS partition my memory's not as good as it once was, a quick search on google has given conflicting information so you may need to contact the manufacturer or microsoft, as PRL says it may be a limit set by the user interface of the STB not the NTFS file system. Does the manual suggest any limits? If you can record or move the files to a subfolder rather than recording them all in the root this may help. What file system does the recorder use if it formats the disk? It may prefer to use EXT2/3 or even Fat32?

Sorry about all the questions but the more we know, the closer we can get to the correct answer. :D

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With this stb, it splits large recordings into seperate files. I have 501 files stored on the HDD. Another thing to note: There are four digits in each and every file number. For example the last file number I recorded is '0501' and the very first is '0001'. So it seems odd that the number limit would be reached in the hundeds rather than the thousands. I would normally assume that the extra digit would indicate that one could easily have 1000 files or more, provided that there was enough space on the HDD.

There's nothing in the instruction manual about creating folders or sub-folders. That sounds like a good idea though.

With the files that are in the Storage Manager, you only seem to have the option of Locking, Deleting or Renaming them.

Yes, I have quite a few short recordings like rock clips etc.

I wish I could archive some of this stuff but I'm a bit restricted where I am now. I currently only have access to another 500gb HDD which is nearly completely full up, and a laptop which has less than 30% free space on it's internal drive. I don't think the laptop has a proper DVD burner....I believe it can make copies of DVDs though.

I admit that I am not computer tech savvy - I'm not familiar with a 'root' or if I'm recording to a root. I'm fairly sure that the drive is not partitioned. This stb doesn't format the disk. Though it can be used with both NTFS and FAT32 fomatted drives.

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I admit that I am not computer tech savvy - I'm not familiar with a 'root' or if I'm recording to a root. I'm fairly sure that the drive is not partitioned. This stb doesn't format the disk. Though it can be used with both NTFS and FAT32 fomatted drives.

The Root folder is just the bottom/lowest level folder, all subfolders branch out from the root. Sorry, but I suspect that some boffin in the early days of computer storage design was a keen botanist. :D

Can you just plug your HDD into your computer, create a new folder on the HDD with the computer called "Archive-02042010" or Video or whatever you like then move (not copy) all the video files from the root into the newly created folder, you shouldn't need to use up the diminishing HDD space on your computer? This way there will be fewer files in the root. Then plug the HDD back into the STB, you should hopefully be able to access the files still, maybe via the media player function.

Edited by lapworth
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The Root folder is just the bottom/lowest level folder, all subfolders branch out from the root. Sorry, but I suspect that some boffin in the early days of computer storage design was a keen botanist. :D

...

"Root" is the distinguished node in a tree (in graph theory). It's actually usually called the "top" node, and the tree is conventionally drawn with the root at the top and the branches going down the page. Many modern file systems have tree-like structures (though Unix file systems are allowed to be a rooted acyclic directed graphs, or a subset of them). Unix popularised tree-like file systems.

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"Root" is the distinguished node in a tree (in graph theory). It's actually usually called the "top" node, and the tree is conventionally drawn with the root at the top and the branches going down the page. Many modern file systems have tree-like structures (though Unix file systems are allowed to be a rooted acyclic directed graphs, or a subset of them). Unix popularised tree-like file systems.

Ok, so perhaps it was an early Graph Theorist who was a Botanist. :lol:

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Lapworth: "Can you just plug your HDD into your computer, create a new folder on the HDD with the computer called "Archive-02042010" or Video or whatever you like then move (not copy) all the video files from the root into the newly created folder, you shouldn't need to use up the diminishing HDD space on your computer? This way there will be fewer files in the root. Then plug the HDD back into the STB, you should hopefully be able to access the files still, maybe via the media player function."

Thanks - that's much more clear. To move the files (rather than copy) do I simply drag them with the mouse to the new folder? Also, I believe that the stb places the video files inside some sort of folder on the HDD. Should I drag this folder (containing the files) into the newly created folder, or move only the files themselves to the new folder? I think there might be a number of sub-folders within one folder - when viewed on a PC.

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Lapworth: "Can you just plug your HDD into your computer, create a new folder on the HDD with the computer called "Archive-02042010" or Video or whatever you like then move (not copy) all the video files from the root into the newly created folder, you shouldn't need to use up the diminishing HDD space on your computer? This way there will be fewer files in the root. Then plug the HDD back into the STB, you should hopefully be able to access the files still, maybe via the media player function."

Thanks - that's much more clear. To move the files (rather than copy) do I simply drag them with the mouse to the new folder? Also, I believe that the stb places the video files inside some sort of folder on the HDD. Should I drag this folder (containing the files) into the newly created folder, or move only the files themselves to the new folder? I think there might be a number of sub-folders within one folder - when viewed on a PC.

I think Lapworth's idea is to create a new folder in the top level folder on the disk (beside the existing recordings folder), and then move entire recordings, whether they are stored as single files or as folders, from the recordings folder to the new folder. As you suggested just use the mouse to drag & drop them from the device's recordings folder into the new folder.

It should work provided the PVR isn't too fussy about exactly what folders exist at the top level on the disk.

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Thanks - that's much more clear. To move the files (rather than copy) do I simply drag them with the mouse to the new folder? Also, I believe that the stb places the video files inside some sort of folder on the HDD. Should I drag this folder (containing the files) into the newly created folder, or move only the files themselves to the new folder? I think there might be a number of sub-folders within one folder - when viewed on a PC.

Yes you can just use the mouse to drag and drop the files/folders, though to make it quicker you can left mouse click on the first file to highlight it then scroll to the bottom of the folder and while holding dow the shift key left mouse click the last file this will highlight all the files so they can be dragged as a block. If you drag using the right mouse button instead of the left, when you let go of the mouse it will bring up a menu asking what you would like to do ie. move/copy/create shortcuts etc. just select move. If you drag with the left mouse button it just selects the default action which should be Move while dragging within the one HDD.

If as you say it does put the files into another folder on the HDD then the problem is unlikely to be a restriction of the number of files allowed in the root folder as NTFS can handle billions within subfolders so we're back to it being a restriction in the User Interface of the recorder itself. If this works as hoped then whenever the main folder gets near full again, just create another archive folder and move the files into it.

Good Luck.

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