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Interesting Article From A Respected Manufacturer...


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Article from Arcam

OK this is a little old as an article now but i just read it and found it gave an interesting background into the origins of the BD/HD DVD 'war' as well as some interesting opinion.

I didn't realise how long ago BD was developed for the japanese broadcast market (obviously in quite a different incarnation than today).

I found it interesting that *not surprisingly* a large part of this whole debacle comes down to royalties and politics :blink: (play nicely now children!)

Oddly enough i wasn't surprised by the advice at the end to "buy our latest best ever CD/DVD player and enjoy great quality now on your existing system" - but it made me think that it seems it will be a while before any of the high end or 'boutique' brands (call them what you will) jump in with both feet into the HD optical format world with regard to either format...

any other opinions?...

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Interesting find. :blink:

I can understand how HD-DVD is just an evolution of the DVD format now and BD is a revolution.

I was particularly fascinated by the comment about focusing on the BD 0.1mm layer and the issue with fingerprints.

I wonder how well the BD format will do as rental where many renters seem to actually apply greasy fingerprints to the discs instead of cleaning off existing smudges (if my experience of DVD rental is anything to go by). Of course the hard protective layer of BD should make it easier to clean them in the first place, but how many renters will want to bother?

I can see rental chains having to change their approaches with BD and clean every disc after it is returned and before it is placed back on the shelf.

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a good read there yam. re ther closing comments, arcam are little biased in that not having a hi-def player in their line-up.

good to read some generally balanced comment in regards both formats though.

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a good read there yam. re ther closing comments, arcam are little biased in that not having a hi-def player in their line-up.

good to read some generally balanced comment in regards both formats though.

Yep I agree 100% there Al - defianate bias, in fact i predicted the gist of their closing comments well before getting that far. I found it an iteresting indication howver of the attitude coming from the 'quality' manufacturers...clearly not too keen to test the waters, rather waiting and seeing before commititing one way or another.

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My DVD rental store already does the 'clean and polish routine' and is rather disconcerted about the vulnerability of Blu-ray discs (even with that hard coating ).

I would suspect rental HD DVD discs would also come with that hard coating (at a cost premium) just as added insurance against mis-handling. If not, then they are capable of being polished as are standard DVD's.

The real dilemma for Rental stores would be with the THD discs.

C.M

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Yep I agree 100% there Al - defianate bias, in fact i predicted the gist of their closing comments well before getting that far. I found it an iteresting indication howver of the attitude coming from the 'quality' manufacturers...clearly not too keen to test the waters, rather waiting and seeing before commititing one way or another.

yes your quite right yam, very interesting reading from another manufacturers point of view especially since arcam is non aligned with either as far as I know.

and yes probably explains in regards other manufacturers really not taking up on either format as yet.

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My DVD rental store already does the 'clean and polish routine' and is rather disconcerted about the vulnerability of Blu-ray discs (even with that hard coating ).

I would suspect rental HD DVD discs would also come with that hard coating (at a cost premium) just as added insurance against mis-handling. If not, then they are capable of being polished as are standard DVD's.

The real dilemma for Rental stores would be with the THD discs.

I notice one of the tasks of the Blockbuster checkout operator, when there are no customers to be served, is to feed a pile of discs through their resurfacing machine now. :blink:

Why the studios didn't go for a cartridge system for the blue-laser formats, which combines disc and case into one compact unit, is beyond my understanding: I would have welcomed a jewel case or smaller sized cartridge . In one fell swoop, they could have made life a lot easier for the industry and public in general. But then, maybe they want an increase in re-sales of damaged-beyond-repair product.

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A friend who worked at a Blockbuster (or similar type) indicated that disks are resurfaced in-store upon complaint, then a red-dot sticker is put on the disk. If a second complaint is recieved, it's sent to an outside polisher, and a second sticker goes on. Third complaint and they toss them

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A friend who worked at a Blockbuster (or similar type) indicated that disks are resurfaced in-store upon complaint, then a red-dot sticker is put on the disk. If a second complaint is recieved, it's sent to an outside polisher, and a second sticker goes on. Third complaint and they toss them

I'm amazed at how resiliant DVDs are to damage: as long as the scratches aren't annular, I have been able to play quite badly scratched (not deep scratches, just lots of them) rentals without issue. It's a different story with greasy fingerprints and food deposits though: for some reason that seems to throw off playback (but is easily fixed with a clean). I'm hoping HD-DVD proves to be similarly robust when it comes to physical damage.

Do some renters use DVDs as a tray for their pizza slices before playing them? One might think so after seeing the condition of some returned discs. :blink: I don't even want to consider what the whitish dried deposit on some discs might be. :D

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I notice one of the tasks of the Blockbuster checkout operator, when there are no customers to be served, is to feed a pile of discs through their resurfacing machine now. :blink:

Why the studios didn't go for a cartridge system for the blue-laser formats, which combines disc and case into one compact unit, is beyond my understanding: I would have welcomed a jewel case or smaller sized cartridge . In one fell swoop, they could have made life a lot easier for the industry and public in general. But then, maybe they want an increase in re-sales of damaged-beyond-repair product.

probably didn't want the extra expense. Besides they make more when you have to re-purchase :D

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wow, that is an interesting article. This part particularly interested me

"Players soon gained a reputation for being notoriously incompatible in that a disc recorded on one brand of recorder would not necessarily replay on another manufacturer’s"

reminds me of the old days when fax machines where first adopted, and one brand of fax machine used a completely different system to the other, so you could really only send a fax to one that was the same brand as yours. interesting how technology evolves and yet at the same time it's just like before

Edited by syekotk
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Error correction on the better class DVD players is quite amazing these days and would need to be even more so on the new HD DVD players. Blu-ray would be sorely tested from surface scratches if it weren't for that hard coating.

Most quality DVD players use read ahead techniques which allows the previous frame to be repeated if the next frame is irreconcilable, this allows the greater majority of errors to go unnoticed.

C.M

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