Jump to content

fixed resolution tvs & high def signals


Recommended Posts

I just went down to a TV vendor today to look at the latest high def TVs. They have CRTs, which can switch between 576, 720 and 1080. They also have the fixed res tvs - such as plasma and lcd. The lcd I was interested in has a vertical res of 768.

Is it just me or are the high def signals gonna look like CRAP on the fixed res tv's? They're gonna look like crap because they have to use digital interpolation to fit them to the new res.

Seems to me CRTs are a much better purchase here in Australia where we have 3 vertical res standards for high def. Unless of course you could get an LCD/plasma that's an integer multiple of all 3 res like 77760.

What do y'all think?

Link to comment
Share on other sites



It depends

If the display has a good scaler it wont matter. If it has a poor scaler than yes it could be a negative.

Yes direct view CRT's do not have a fixed pixel matrix, BUT they are way small, pretty much pointless, esp for HD unless one is sitting a metre or so away.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It depends

If the display has a good scaler it wont matter.  If it has a poor scaler than yes it could be a negative.

Yes direct view CRT's do not have a fixed pixel matrix, BUT they are way small, pretty much pointless, esp for HD unless one is sitting a metre or so away.

Oh boy! I could see this coming on... :blink:

Even though I am a card-carrying member of the CRT fanclub, I'll answer this objectively!

The best way to decide on what display to go with is to firstly work out what size you want/need, and the limitations of your viewing zone ... rather than simply going either "by the numbers" (ie CRT - cause it can beat the others hands down in the resolution stakes) or "with the herd" (ie plasma - cause the Jones have one! - :P )

If you are going to be viewing from fairly close up {and want the best in all-round PQ), the CRT can be the better choice.

If you are viewing from farther away, it could be the plasma is better - even though it will be digitally scaling everything. (This process has been being improved constantly, and people like Ian will convince you that some plasmas can do this wonderfully now)

If you can really darken the room, and you have the space for a screen, and the distance to sit back from it, projection could be the answer.

Rear-projection is even an option.

BTW: Its normally a given that ANY display will look like sh*t in most vendor's outlets! Especially Harvey Norman $tores, and their ilk.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

POINTLESS I said, can't you read!!! Damn you and your Colour Retarted Tube

bahahah j/k though i do like doing the odd bit of "fishing"

nah but seriously what you said is true, for close viewing (say 1.5m or close) an 86inch crt with decent errrrm "res" ablity (what every ya call it hehe) is great option and will provide the best picture vs similarly sized displays.

Though for slightly further distances 2-2.5m or so then a decent plasma is a good option, if your a little further and can control the light in you room (or will only be watching at night) then a projector is the best $ vs Size vs PictureQuality option here. (PQ of a projector can surpass direct views or less $)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually I think I was on crack in my original post. Of course a CRT is a fixed res device! It has individual pixel elements on the screen that you can see - you ain't gonna see a higher res than the number of pixel elements that you have.

Having said that, I've been trying to chase up the actual resolutions of CRTs - according to the number of pixels they have. I've found that a few big makers say 'accepts high def inputs' - as opposed to saying 'displays high def'. That makes me think the res on them isn't actually high enough to display a high def signal. I also could not find data on the actual resolutions, according to the number of pixels, of TV's on any major maker's site here in Aus.

I'm also a bit confused about 1080i. None of the lcd's or plasmas I've seen (even $10k ones) are able to show this res! They show up to 768 vertical! If not one of the display devices actually support 1080i, why are some broadcasters here putting out 1080i?

Link to comment
Share on other sites





Actually I think I was on crack in my original post. Of course a CRT is a fixed res device! It has individual pixel elements on the screen that you can see - you ain't gonna see a higher res than the number of pixel elements that you have.

Having said that, I've been trying to chase up the actual resolutions of CRTs - according to the number of pixels they have. I've found that a few big makers say 'accepts high def inputs' - as opposed to saying 'displays high def'. That makes me think the res on them isn't actually high enough to display a high def signal. I also could not find data on the actual resolutions, according to the number of pixels, of TV's on any major maker's site here in Aus.

I'm also a bit confused about 1080i. None of the lcd's or plasmas I've seen (even $10k ones) are able to show this res! They show up to 768 vertical! If not one of the display devices actually support 1080i, why are some broadcasters here putting out 1080i?

Manufacturers' shadow-mask specs are almost impossible to find (and even respected manufacturers like Toshiba will lie!). I have therefore measured a few as described in this thread.

It was only after finding that my favourite 86cm CRT shadow-masks could only show about 1,000 pixels horizontally and about 700 vertically - irrespective of 'supported' input resolutions - that I decided to blow my budget on a 1024x768 HD NEC plasma; to get the same resolution on a larger screen ... in a much slimmer and lighter cabinet ... with no digital artefacts.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest danny1503559861

I managed to get the real high definition (1920 by 1080i) picture on my 46" Toshiba rear projection TV, but it took a lot of research to get around all of the bad information out there to find which equipment to buy.

Most plasma's peak out at 1366 by 768 although there is a new one coming out that is supposed to handle 1920 by 1080 but it's 70" and will cost a fortune.

I only seem to see CRT projectors, that can handle the 1920 by 1080, and last time I checked they were around 20,000.

My TV model 46vw9ue actually manages 1080 interlaced scan lines and looks great, but only when :-

The movie was broadcast in native 1080i, not upconverted.

The setop box is high definition and set to send out the signal in 1080i high definition.

It is using component leads to get from the settop box to the tv.

The leads are plugged into the high definition plugs section on the back of the tv.

When all of these things are met, you hear a relay click inside of the tv and the picture changes to a razer sharp format, channel 90's demo looks the best.

The set also has an excellent upconverter inside so that DVD's play back at about 90% the quality of HDTV, it has limits when playing a video though which are only 250 lines instead of the 500 on DVD's.

I picked mine up for 3,000 on sale and still can't believe how good it is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...
To Top