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HDTV Expert Calibration


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Part of Original Article (cnet.com.au) :

You've just purchased a expensive new TV--but you have to spend hundreds more to get it professionally calibrated. Is it worth the money?

Kevin Miller talks to TVs. I'd call him a TV whisperer, except Miller -- one of CNET's main US TV reviewers and a leading video expert who has his own home-theatre consulting business -- doesn't usually speak in gentle, soothing tones while working. No, when trying to tame the picture on one of the many plasmas, LCDs, rear-projections HDTVs and front projectors he calibrates during a given month, he generally talks to them in insults laced with expletives -- depending, of course, on how uncooperative the set is while undergoing a calibration.

Just the other day, I passed our A/V room, and there was Miller standing in front of a 42-inch ViewSonic plasma, chaffing, "You son of a ****." I thought he was having trouble getting into the special technician's service menu and asked him what was wrong. It turned out that something right was bothering him: one of the set's preset picture modes was actually producing a good picture.

"This is bad for business," Miller said. "Bad for my business."

Full article from and found at:

http://www.cnet.com.au/hometheatre/tvs/0,3...40000702,00.htm

Regards

DA

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Maybe for people dropping a fortune on their displays, and who want it to look good, but cant be buggered doing it themselves...

...but I've got much better things to do with $400!!!

($400 seems rather excessive, especially if its for something like a plasma! A full recallibration of a CRT projector, perhaps - at a stretch - but a plasma!?

Hell, I should go into the business!!!)

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Maybe for people dropping a fortune on their displays, and who want it to look good, but cant be buggered doing it themselves...

...but I've got much better things to do with $400!!!

($400 seems rather excessive, especially if its for something like a plasma! A full recallibration of a CRT projector, perhaps - at a stretch - but a plasma!?

Hell, I should go into the business!!!)

Yeah a full calibration for $400 of a CRT projector would be close to the mark but your right for a plasma for get it.

I am getting mine done on the 14th of Nov at a cost of $250 by one of the guys on the CRT A-Team may ask i have on 1272 done as well

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Maybe for people dropping a fortune on their displays, and who want it to look good, but cant be buggered doing it themselves...

...but I've got much better things to do with $400!!!

($400 seems rather excessive, especially if its for something like a plasma! A full recallibration of a CRT projector, perhaps - at a stretch - but a plasma!?

Hell, I should go into the business!!!)

and we all know plasmas seem to have a settling period. what a waste to get him in for a setup only to have to keep getting him back while the panel settles down - all for $400 a pop!

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Maybe for people dropping a fortune on their displays, and who want it to look good, but cant be buggered doing it themselves...

...but I've got much better things to do with $400!!!

($400 seems rather excessive, especially if its for something like a plasma! A full recallibration of a CRT projector, perhaps - at a stretch - but a plasma!?

Hell, I should go into the business!!!)

and we all know plasmas seem to have a settling period. what a waste to get him in for a setup only to have to keep getting him back while the panel settles down - all for $400 a pop!

Yeah that why i have mine running in

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How much do you think a plumber charges to per hour to fix your taps or how much a mechanic charges to fix your car?

Setting up a CRT display takes time and skill, so $400 does not sound unreasonable. However it does seem unreasonable to charge the same amount for a digital display, as it is definitely much less work.

People spend hundreds of dollars on cables that make very little difference or even more on a different model display of the same size.

Calibration can make a HUGE difference on some displays and is worth every cent, unless you are a tight arse of course. :blink:

Regards,

Owen

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How much do you think a plumber charges to per hour to fix your taps or how much a mechanic charges to fix your car?

Setting up a CRT display takes time and skill, so $400 does not sound unreasonable. However it does seem unreasonable to charge the same amount for a digital display, as it is definitely much less work.

People spend hundreds of dollars on cables that make very little difference or even more on a different model display of the same size.

Calibration can make a HUGE difference on some displays and is worth every cent, unless you are a tight arse of course. :blink:

Regards,

Owen

Amen

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How much do you think a plumber charges to per hour to fix your taps or how much a mechanic charges to fix your car?

Setting up a CRT display takes time and skill, so $400 does not sound unreasonable. However it does seem unreasonable to charge the same amount for a digital display, as it is definitely much less work.

People spend hundreds of dollars on cables that make very little difference or even more on a different model display of the same size.

Calibration can make a HUGE difference on some displays and is worth every cent, unless you are a tight arse of course. :blink:

Regards,

Owen

Amen

I would 'Amen' too, as soon as someone tells me if the $400 is AUD or USD?

Ritesh

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How much do you think a plumber charges to per hour to fix your taps or how much a mechanic charges to fix your car?

Setting up a CRT display takes time and skill, so $400 does not sound unreasonable. However it does seem unreasonable to charge the same amount for a digital display, as it is definitely much less work.

People spend hundreds of dollars on cables that make very little difference or even more on a different model display of the same size.

Calibration can make a HUGE difference on some displays and is worth every cent, unless you are a tight arse of course. :blink:

Regards,

Owen

Amen

I would 'Amen' too, as soon as someone tells me if the $400 is AUD or USD?

Ritesh

lol

In the US it would be US is pretty much what they pay

But over here its AUD is the standard for us

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How much do you think a plumber charges to per hour to fix your taps or how much a mechanic charges to fix your car?

Setting up a CRT display takes time and skill, so $400 does not sound unreasonable. However it does seem unreasonable to charge the same amount for a digital display, as it is definitely much less work.

People spend hundreds of dollars on cables that make very little difference or even more on a different model display of the same size.

Calibration can make a HUGE difference on some displays and is worth every cent, unless you are a tight arse of course. :blink:

Regards,

Owen

Amen

I would 'Amen' too, as soon as someone tells me if the $400 is AUD or USD?

Ritesh

lol

In the US it would be US is pretty much what they pay

But over here its AUD is the standard for us

Quite true, except the original article posted (whilst on cnet.com.AU) actually is talking about US market, and a US specialist, who is "certified by the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF)", which is a certification authority in US. Almost everyone on AVS has their display ISF-calibrated.

Thus, I am pretty sure the $400 mentioned on the website is for US market and thus is in USD.

Ritesh

PS: Personally, I think the original article has little relevance here, due to the differences in our market (compare to US), further there isn't a body like ISF giving acreditation/certificates/degrees to people who have careers in calibrating devices...

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Personally, I think the original article has little relevance here, due to the differences in our market (compare to US), further there isn't a body like ISF giving acreditation/certificates/degrees to people who have careers in calibrating devices...

A waste of an article for Australians but it get's lots of US press. As you mention the market demand in the USA is different.

Almost everyone on AVS has their display ISF-calibrated.

Thus, I am pretty sure the $400 mentioned on the website is for US market and thus is in USD.

Its US$. The AVS forum is full of them. I looked at a web site on it and they charge a whole lot more than just the basic US$400. They have it as a business and are set up just for doing calibrations and modifications.

Here's a few cuts and the web site.

This rear projection TV package on sets less than 70 inch size currently costs $450 plus travel, and again, covers only your primary designated input/mode/format/aspect ratio - NTSC or HD; for both see next paragraph. Use of progressive 480p DVDPs is preferred and covers 480i sources like S or DSS or cable or OTA NTSC channels. If transferring from i to p scanning by upgrading your DVDP in the future, side to side and/or up and down positioning may be affected to a certain degree;

Due to the increased precision needed for For RPTVs 70 inches and larger, an extra $100 is charged on TVs of this larger size, per scanrate.

For calibration of BOTH NTSC and HD, the price is an additional $200, or $300 for larger TVs. That means $650 plus travel, $750 for TVs 70" and larger. This covers your primary input mode format or aspect ratio in EACH of both the 480i/p NTSC and 1080i HD modes of your TV. An additional $200/300 will be charged if your TV is 720p capable, and you wish this scanrate calibrated also.

Ground traveltime is $60/hr. RT, from my location to yours and back. Air travel is charged at the rate of $25/hr for airtime and airport waiting time, all of which is lost production time. Clients who live within 15-20 minutes of the airport will not be charged any extra groundtraveltime, but if farther than that, the $60/hr rate kicks in. Take me to dinner or lunch on the way home from the airport, and those charges have been known to have been waived, as long as you don't live TOO far away...

Anything aside from that is extra, and will be talked about with the customer at the time, before work is performed on that extra.

Duvetyne/black felt installation, tho you don't need my technical expertise for an operation like this. My hourly rate on this op is $95/hr., with you providing all materials and tools. Just over an hour is usually a pretty good timeframe expectation.

For out of town/out of state clients, those over 20-30 miles away from my home base of San Lorenzo and the SF Bay Area: All out of town/out of state calibrations are to be paid for in cash, money orders or traveler's checks;

http://www.keohi.com/keohihdtv/isf/mrbob/i...cing_mrbob.html

I loved the Oz CEDIA note which tried to make it relevent to Australia.

Visiting the au web site it seems that Oz CEDIA members are hifi shops that pay a members fee.

http://www.cnet.com.au/hometheatre/tvs/0,3...000276-4,00.htm

(* Editor's Note: The Imaging Science Foundation is a US-based organisation. Australians might like to contact a member of CEDIA - the Custom Electronics Design and Installation Association. Local CEDIA listings can be found at www.cedia.com.au)
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How much do you think a plumber charges to per hour to fix your taps or how much a mechanic charges to fix your car?

Setting up a CRT display takes time and skill, so $400 does not sound unreasonable. However it does seem unreasonable to charge the same amount for a digital display, as it is definitely much less work.

People spend hundreds of dollars on cables that make very little difference or even more on a different model display of the same size.

Calibration can make a HUGE difference on some displays and is worth every cent, unless you are a tight arse of course. :blink:

Regards,

Owen

Amen

I would 'Amen' too, as soon as someone tells me if the $400 is AUD or USD?

Ritesh

lol

In the US it would be US is pretty much what they pay

But over here its AUD is the standard for us

Quite true, except the original article posted (whilst on cnet.com.AU) actually is talking about US market, and a US specialist, who is "certified by the Imaging Science Foundation (ISF)", which is a certification authority in US. Almost everyone on AVS has their display ISF-calibrated.

Thus, I am pretty sure the $400 mentioned on the website is for US market and thus is in USD.

Ritesh

PS: Personally, I think the original article has little relevance here, due to the differences in our market (compare to US), further there isn't a body like ISF giving acreditation/certificates/degrees to people who have careers in calibrating devices...

For anyone interested in the that live in WA there is one of the CRT A-Team guys that does this for aliving on CRT Projectors and rear projection tv , Plasma and LCD

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