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Front vs Side firing woofers


shaky
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Can you guys please enlighten me on the pros and cons in DIY floorstanders of side firing woofers as opposed to front firing them?. Have read about limiting high pass for woofers so side firing ones cannot be audibly located but assume this would be the same no matter whereabouts the woofers were mounted in. enclosures.

One other way to look at this, if I had active EQ and even time alignment adjustability would most cons (if any) with side firing woofers be overcome easily?

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Anyone?

 

Resaon I ask is I have picked up some temporary cabinets to trial some drivers I am looking at using in DIY speakers. However the largest mid is wider than the baffle of the cabinet and hence also the cabinet itself. I could widen the baffle, cut sides of enclosure, and rework sides around this mid but wondering if sidefiring would give me similar to same response as if they were traditionally mounted to front baffle

Edited by shaky
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@@henry218, Henry at what xover frequency do you recommend cutting drivers if mounted on side of enclosure? Have read widely different views of anywhere between 80-300Hz so a bit uncertain.

depends on your mid, box height, woofer position etc. however 100-200hz is the usual range.

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As well as the frequency chosen ....  a big factor is the slope of the filter.    That is why you might see people state a wide range of "acceptable frequencies".

 

Essentially, the issue is that above a certain frequency, a driver becomes directional  .....  for a side firing driver, this will mean that more sound is being radiated to the side of the speaker, than is coming around to the front of the speaker (eg. to blend with a front-firing driver)    ....   and to a greater or lesser extent, the frequency response of the speaker is degraded.

 

The directivity of a driver is dictated by it's size .... so obviously that is a potential factor too  (smaller drivers will be omni-directional to a higher frequency).

 

 

 

Pushing the crossover filter as low and as steep as possible, is a way to avoid the issue.     I'd consider 120Hz and 24dB/octave to be 'safe' ... with the octave above being where you could experiment.

 

 

running active if that makes any difference

 

None.

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